https://iapdworld.org/about-the-congress/


The biennial International Congress is the most important event of IAPD, both academically and socially

The IAPD Congress is held in a different member country every two years.

The scientific program enables the IAPD members to present their academic work to a widely international audience. The Congress also provides a great opportunity for dental professionals, to meet and exchange information in the field of paediatric dentistry. More than 1500 paediatric dentists from around the globe have attended the last  IAPD Congress.

2009 Munich Congress Program

2011 Athens Congress Program

2013 Seoul Congress program

2015 Glasgow Congress Program

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https://iapdworld.org/abstract-submission/



Poster Instructions


Abstract Submission is Closed

Abstract Submission Deadline Extended:

We are accepting abstracts for e-poster presentation

Instructions to All Applicants

Before you begin, please prepare the following information:

 

Important Note:

A new submission option added:

Due to COVID-19 we understand that many academic institutions are not operating at full capacity and research may not have been completed on schedule. We are therefore adding the following option for abstract submission:

Scholarly Literature  Reviews

• Background
• Literature Review
• Conclusions

Research Abstracts Layout

• Background
• Methods
• Results
• Conclusions

Case Report Abstracts Layout

• Introduction
• Case Report
• Discussion
• Conclusion

CONFLICT OF INTEREST & ETHICAL APPROVAL

Depending on the nature of the research, some abstract presenters may be required to obtain Ethical Clearance. Kindly note that you will be prompted to confirm that you received ethical clearance (if applicable) and to declare any conflict of interests in your presentation (if applicable) before completing the submission process.

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/


The biennial International Congress is the most important event of IAPD, both academically and socially

The IAPD Congress is held in a different member country every two years.

The scientific program enables the IAPD members to present their academic work to a widely international audience. The Congress also provides a great opportunity for dental professionals, to meet and exchange information in the field of paediatric dentistry. More than 1500 paediatric dentists from around the globe have attended the last  IAPD Congress.

2009 Munich Congress Program

2011 Athens Congress Program

2013 Seoul Congress program

2015 Glasgow Congress Program

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/morita-award-case-report-research/


Bengt Magnusson Memorial Prize in Child Dental Health

 

The prize is awarded in the memory of Professor Bengt Magnusson of Göteberg, Sweden, a founder of Paediatric Dentistry and a former member of the IAPD until his death in 1981. This prize is awarded on alternate years at the IAPD Congress for the best submitted essay. 

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org

 

Bengt Magnusson Memorial Prize in Child Dental Health

Prize Value:
EUR 1000

 

This award will be presented at the next IAPD Congress.

 

Rules

1. The Prize is open to all current Members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry.

2. Registration to the Congress is a requirement for the awards entry.

3. The Prize will be awarded for the most meritorious essay submitted on a subject in the field of Child Dental Health. It will be judged by an international panel of adjudicators.

4. The essay must be an unpublished work and suitable for publication in the IJPD (International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry).

5. The manuscript should be in English and should follow the guidelines for submitting a paper to the International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry.

6. The manuscript should be based on original and previously unpublished work, and may be presented under joint authorship.

7. The manuscript must be submitted under a nom de plume. The nom de plume must be written on the essay cover page. Your full contact details will be filled into the electronic submission form and should NOT be included anywhere on the essay cover page.

8. All nominees will present their work in an Oral Presentation during the Congress. Each contestant will be allotted maximum 15 minutes for their oral Power Point presentation followed by 5 minutes of questions and discussion.

9. Presentation of a certificate to the winner is made at the Closing Ceremony by the Awards Committee Chair and the winner is required to participate in the ceremony.

10. The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry reserves the right of publication of the prize – winning essay.

11. Applications will take place on the IAPD Congress website.

 

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org for more infromation

 

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/bid-for-a-future-iapd-congress/


50 Years of IAPD | Congresses, Meetings & Workshops

How to Bid for a Future Congress

A ‘bid` for a future IAPD Congress shall be subject to and carried out according to the IAPD Congress Guidelines (2019).

Bids are normally submitted and considered by IAPD Board and Congress Site Selection Committee two congresses in advance. The Secretary General of the IAPD sends the “Invitation to Bid” letters to all National Member Societies approximately 12 months before the upcoming Congress. A notice will also be placed on the IAPD website and in the Newsletter.

IAPD Congress Guidelines (2019)

Watch this space to see when the next bid opens!

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/bright-smiles-bright-futures-award-by-colgate/


Bright Smiles, Bright Futures Award by Colgate

 The award is presented on alternate years at the IAPD Congress for the best preventive oral health community program serving children.

The value of the Prize is 2000 US Dollars (two thousand dollars). In addition, there will be three runners up prizes of 500 US dollars (five hundred dollars) each.

 

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org for more information.

 

Prize Value:
USD 2,000

 

This award will be presented at the next IAPD Congress

 

 

Rules

1. The Prize is open to any individual or organization responsible for creating or implementing a preventive oral health community program serving children. The prize is open to all current members of IAPD. In case of joint authorship, at least one applicant must be a current IAPD member.

2. Registration to the Congress is a requirement for the competition entry.

3. The Prize will be awarded for the most meritorious preventive oral health community program serving children. Programs will be judged on impact, educational materials and presentation. It will be judged by an international panel of adjudicators.

4. A 100 words abstract and three page description of the program should be included with the completed application.

5. All candidates will be required to give a maximum 10 minutes oral presentation about their
work, followed by 5 minutes of questions and discussion.

6. Presentation of certificate to the winner of the preventive oral health community program serving children is made at the Opening Ceremony by the representative of Colgate Company.

7. The presence of the recipient at the ceremony is mandatory.

8. All entries are to be sent electronically to iapd@iapdworld.org in their final and completed version before 31 March, 2021. The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry reserves the right of publication of the prize (winning essay).

 


Click here to download the application form

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/bursaries-awards/


Bursaries & Awards

 

There are several prizes and travel bursaries available for IAPD members during the biennial congresses. Please note that  you can apply for one bursary or award only.

For more information please contact the IAPD Secretariat:

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org

 

Bengt Magnusson Memorial Prize in Child Dental Health


In memory of Professor Bengt Magnusson. 
Sponsored by Elevate Oral Care
Awarded to a young paediatric dentist for the best submitted research paper to coincide with the IAPD Congress every two years.
Details

Bright Smiles Bright, Futures Award

Awarded to the best community education program submitted, sponsored by Colgate.

Details

Dr Sam Harris Travel Bursaries

Three bursaries will be available for the IAPD biennial Congress. Preference is given to applicants with an abstract submitted/accepted for the Congress, persons who have not received a bursary previously and those from less wealthy nations.

Details

Jens Andreasen
Award

In honour of Prof Jens Andreasen
funded from IAPD general account acquired from the Andreasen pre-Congress lectures.
Biennial award, that is presented for the best poster on dental traumatology in children.

Details

Nu Smile Restorative Dentistry
Case Report & Research

Presented oat the IAPD Congress for both the best poster of a case
report and research report on any in the field of pediatric restorative dentistry.
Sponsored by Nu Smile.

Details

Morita Award
Case Report & Research

Presented at the IAPD Congress for both the best poster of a case report & research report on any clinical topic.
Sponsored by the Morita Corporation

Details

Paediatric Dentistry
Working Group
Travel Bursaries

Two travel bursaries will be available for the IAPD Biennial Congress. Funding for the bursaries comes from direct funding by the Paediatric Dentistry Working Group in Africa.

Details

JSPD Award

These travel awards were first presented at the IAPD Global Summit in Bangkok, Thailand 2018.

Details

Bursary & Award

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/upcoming-congress-events/


Join Us for the Upcoming Events!

28th IAPD Congress, 2021

June 10-13, 2021
Virtual
(info coming soon)

29th IAPD Congress, 2023

June 14-17, 2023
Maastricht, Netherlands

Recent Events

IAPD20 Virtual

September 13-17, 2020

The IAPD Biennial Congress

The biennial International Congress is the most important event of IAPD, both academically and socially.

The IAPD Congress is held in a different member country every two years.

The scientific program enables the IAPD members to present their academic work to a widely international audience. The Congress also provides a great opportunity for dental professionals, to meet and exchange information in the field of paediatric dentistry. More than 1500 paediatric dentists from around the globe have attended the last  IAPD Congress.

2019 Cancun Congress Programme

2017 Santiago Congress Program

2015 Glasgow Congress Programme

2013 Seoul Congress Programme

2011 Athens Congress Programme

2009 Munich Congress Programme

Congress Award Winners


Bursaries & Awards

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/congress-photos/


2019 Cancun Congress – 50th Anniversary

2015 Glasgow Congress

July 1 2015

July 2 2015

July 4 2015

2013 Seoul Congress

2011 Athens Congress

2009 Munich Congress

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/how-to-bid-for-future-iapd-congress/


50 Years of IAPD | Congresses, Meetings & Workshops

How to Bid for a Future Congress

A ‘bid` for a future IAPD Congress shall be subject to and carried out according to the IAPD Congress Guidelines (2019).

Bids are normally submitted and considered by IAPD Board and Congress Site Selection Committee two congresses in advance. The Secretary General of the IAPD sends the “Invitation to Bid” letters to all National Member Societies approximately 12 months before the upcoming Congress. A notice will also be placed on the IAPD website and in the Newsletter.

IAPD Congress Guidelines (2019)

Bid to Host the 30th Congress of IAPD (2025) Now!

IAPD National Member Societies are Invited to Bid to Host the 30th Congress of IAPD

For your information, a summary of the process of bidding to host an IAPD Congress is as follows:

We do hope that your Society will consider bidding to host the 30th Congress of our Association.

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/iapd20-virtual/


Welcome Note

Due to COVID-19, we are now learning new ways to keep up to date and new ways to communicate. Recent innovations in information technology now are available to share knowledge and remain connected.

The IAPD webinars over the past few months have been a great success in becoming a trusted source for communications and evidence-based-dentistry.

In our continuous effort to support you in this new era, the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry is organising an innovative program — IAPD20 Virtual that will take place between 13-17 September 2020.

On behalf of the IAPD Board of Directors and the Scientific/Organizing Committee of IAPD20 Virtual, we wish to invite you to join this exciting new venture with 23 internationally recognized speakers from different parts of the world.

This virtual meeting should greatly contribute to your oral health knowledge, as well as enable you to stay connected with the IAPD and your colleagues from all over the world.

Stay tuned for more details about how this new interface will greatly facilitate your IAPD experience.

Marcelo Bönecker

PRESIDENT
(Brazil)

Ari Kupietzky

SECRETARY GENERAL
(Israel)


About

General Information


Programme

*GMT Time Zone

*Subject to changes


Registration


Speakers


SPONSORSHIP

Sponsors and Exhibitors


Abstract Submission

Meeting Topics

Organizing Committee

Marcelo Bönecker

PRESIDENT

(Brazil)

Ari Kupietzky

SECRETARY GENERAL

(Israel)

Anna-Maria Vierrou

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT

(Greece)

Marietjie Weakley

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(South Africa)

Scientific Committee

James Crall

HONORARY EDITOR

(USA)

Figen Seymen

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(Turkey)

Norman Tinanoff

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(USA)

Young J. Kim

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(South Korea)

Sponsors & Exhibitors

Platinum Partner


Sponsors & Exhibitors










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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/japanese-society-of-paediatric-dentistry-award/


The JSPD Travel Award for Young Researchers from Developing Countries

Important Announcement
The IAPD Board of Directors has announced the postponement of the 2nd Global Summit, Global Pathway to Evidence-Based Dental Caries Management in Children, which was set to take place from 6-8 November 2020 in Taipei, Taiwan. We are all facing an unprecedented global impact with the Covid-19 crisis and what the future will hold for the months to come is still unclear. With the global pandemic still accelerating in several areas of the world, this decision was made with the safety of participants and our global communities firmly in mind. The new date for the event is likely to be early in 2022. We will provide an update as soon as a new date has been confirmed. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the IAPD Secretariat at iapd@iapdworld.org

 

Young researchers travelling to the IAPD Global Summit from Developing Countries (as defined by the World Bank) are invited to submit their poster presentation to be in line for the prestigious Japanese Society of Pediatric Dentistry Travel Award. 

If you fit the criteria and wish to apply for the JSPD award, please follow these two steps:

1. Submit your abstract online on the Summit Website

2. When you have completed step one, send the application form to the IAPD Secretariat at iapd@iapdworld.org

Please read the Rules of the JSPD Award carefully.

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org

 

Travel Awards Are Valued at:

up to 4,0000 JPN Each

 

These awards are administered for the IAPD 2nd Global Summit in Taipei, Taiwan 6-8 November 2020.

Congress Secretariat Email: secretariat@iapdsummit.org

Global Summit Website: www.iapd2021.org

 


Aim of the Award

The Award is aimed at researchers in pediatric dentistry requesting to present their work and gain insight from their peers in the field. The Award will facilitate their attendance at the IAPD Global Summit Meeting and/or Biennial Congress.

 

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org for more information.

 

Eligibility


Click here to see the list of developing countries

Information for Applicants

Current IAPD members are eligible to apply for the Travel Award of up to 400,000 JPN that are awarded by IAPD for its IAPD Global Summit Meeting and/or Biennial Congress. Funding for the Awards comes from the fund established by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Dentistry (JSPD).

Travel awards are given based upon need, significance of the research, level of participation in the Meeting, and whether or not an individual has received an award before.

Applicants should write to the IAPD Secretariat stating how the Award would be particularly helpful to them.

Each application should be accompanied by a short Curriculum Vitae, a copy of the abstract for poster presentation and a research essay to be submitted to the Meeting and a letter of support from a supervisor (optional).

Applications will be accepted up to the date of the deadline of the submission of abstracts for that Meeting.

Applicants are not eligible for another prize at the Meetings

 

Criteria

The Awards Committee will take into account mainly the short research essay (type of study; objectives; material and methods, results and conclusion), curriculum vitae (candidate’s articles published, poster presentations in other Meetings, etc) and the need for the Award reimbursement.

Rules

1. Up to 2 awards of up to 400,000 JPN each (airfare, four nights accommodation and registration) will be available for IAPD Summit Meeting depending on the Secretary General and President’s decision based on the recommendations of the Awards Committee.

2. The number of the awards at each Meeting should be publicized in the International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry before the Meeting, and on both the IAPD and the Meeting websites.

3. Applicants must submit their abstracts, research essay and curriculum vitae via the Meeting website, following all necessary steps required.

4. Deadline for the submission of the abstracts, research essay and curriculum vitae is the deadline of the abstracts of the Meeting.

5. The IAPD secretariat forward to the members of the Awards Committee the applications for the travel awards.

6. The Awards Committee will rank the applicants submissions based on: the short research essay (type of study; objectives; material and methods, results and conclusion) the need and curriculum vitae based on articles published, poster presentations in other Meetings, etc. The Awards Committee members should base their selection on the scientific value of the work presented by the applicant and on his/her contribution to the IAPD development.

7. The Awards are decided four months prior to the Meeting so as to help the winners cover their expenses to attend the meeting.

8. The early registration fee of the Meeting will apply for the winners of the JSPD Travel Awards.

9. Winners will be asked to acknowledge on their presentation that they were supported by an IAPD Award.

10. A certificate will be awarded to the winners at the closing ceremony.

11. Payment will be done to the awardees after the Meeting by wire transfer upon receipt of bank details.

12. Any other matter or situation not considered in these RULES will be EXCLUSIVELY DECIDED UPON BY THE Awards Committee. Final decisions on the awards will be made by the Awards Committee. A JSPD representative shall join the Awards Committee for deliberation and selection decision.

 

 

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org for more information.

 

Please note
The award application process is currently under review. Please keep an eye on the 2021 congress website www.iapd2021.org where we will publish the most updated application procedures.

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/jens-andreasen-award-rules/


Jens Andreasen Award

 

Presented in honour of Prof Jens Andreasen on alternate years at the IAPD Congress for the best poster on dental trauma. The award is financed fro funds in the IAPD general account, which were acquired from the Andreasen Pre-Congress ectures.

For more information, contact the IAPD Secretariat

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org

 

Jens Andreasen Award | Dental Trauma

Prize Value:
GBP 400

 

This award will be presented at the next IAPD Congress.

 

Rules

1. The Prize is open to all current Members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry.

2. Registration to the Congress is a requirement for the awards entry.

3. The Prize will be awarded for the most meritorious poster on dental trauma. It will be judged by an international panel of adjudicators.

4. The poster should be based on original and previously unpublished work, and may be presented under joint authorship.

5. All candidates will be required to give a 3 minutes oral presentation about their work, followed by 2 minutes of questions and discussion.

6. Finalists will be required to give their presentation to the judges in a separate finalist session.

7. Presentation of a certificate to the winner is made at the Closing Ceremony by the Awards Committee Chair. The presence of the recipient at the ceremony is mandatory.

8. The presence of the recipient at the ceremony is mandatory.
 

Please note
The award application process is currently under review. Please keep an eye on the 2021 congress website www.iapd2021.org where we will publish the most updated application procedures.

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/morita-award-rules/


Morita Award | Case Report & Research Report

 

These two awards are presented on alternate years at the IAPD Congress for the best poster of a Case Report on any clinical topic and the best poster of Research on any clinical topic. 

Contact the IAPD Secretariat for more information at IAPD@iapdworld.org

Each Prize is Valued at:
USD 1000

 

These awards will be presented at the next IAPD Congress.

 

Rules

1. The Prize is open to all current Members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry. In case of joint authorship, at least one applicant must be a current IAPD member.

2. Registration to the Congress is a requirement for all award entries.

3. One prize will be awarded for the most meritorious poster of research on any clinical topic and one prize will be awarded for the most meritorious poster of a case report on any clinical topic. Both prizes will be judged by an international panel of adjudicators.

4. The posters should be based on original and previously unpublished work and may be presented under joint authorship.

5. All abstracts will be evaluated in advance by the allocated judges so as to select the finalists.

6. All candidates will be required to give a 3 minutes oral presentation about their work, followed by 2 minutes of questions and discussion.

7. Finalists will be required to give their presentation to the judges in a separate finalist session.

8. Presentation of a certificate to the winner of the research poster is made at the Closing Ceremony by the representative of the Morita Corporation. 

9. Presentation of a certificate to the winner is made at the Closing Ceremony by the Awards Committee Chair and the winner is required to participate in the ceremony. The presence of the recipient at the ceremony is mandatory.

10. The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry reserves the right of publication of the winning posters.

11. Applications will take place on the IAPD Congress website.

 

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/nu-smile-restorative-dentistry-case-report-research/


Nu Smile Restorative Dentistry Awards | Case Report & Research

 

These two awards are presented on alternate years at the IAPD Congress for the best poster of a Case Report in the field of paediatric restorative dentistry and the best poster of Research in the field of paediatric restorative dentistry. 

Contact the IAPD Secretariat for more information at IAPD@iapdworld.org

Each Prize is Valued at:
USD 1000

 

These awards will be presented at the next IAPD Congress.

Rules

1. Open to all current Members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry. In case of joint authorship, at least one applicant must be a current IAPD member.

2. Registration to the Congress is a requirement for the competition entry.

3. One Prize will be awarded for the most meritorious poster of research in the field of paediatric restorative dentistry. One prize will be awarded for the most meritorious poster of a case report in the field of paediatric restorative dentistry. It will be judged by an international panel of adjudicators.

4. The posters should be based on original and previously unpublished work and may be presented under joint authorship.

5. All candidates will be required to give a 3 minutes oral presentation about their work, followed by 2 minutes of questions and discussion.

6. Finalists will be required to give their presentation to the judges in a separate finalist session.

7. Presentation of certificate to the winner of the research poster is made at the Closing Ceremony by the representative of the NuSmile Company. The presence of the recipient at the ceremony is mandatory.

8. Applications will take place on the IAPD congress website.

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org for more information.

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/pediatric-dentistry-working-group-travel-bursaries/


Paediatric Dentistry Working Group Travel Bursaries

 

Two travel bursaries of 1000 US$ each will be available for the IAPD Biennial Congress.Funding for the bursaries comes from direct funding by the Paediatric Dentistry Working Group in Africa.

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org

 

Prizes Valued at:
USD 1000 each

 

These awards will be available for the next IAPD in-person Congress.

Rules

1. These travel bursaries are restricted to African delegates travelling to the IAPD Congress.

2. Applicants must be current members of the IAPD.

3.  Applicants should submit and upload a letter stating how the Bursary would be particularly helpful to them.

4. Applicants shall be eligible for a travel bursary of US$ 1000 (One Thousand Dollars).

5. Each application should be accompanied by a copy of a poster abstract submitted to the Congress.

6. Each application should be accompanied by a short Curriculum Vitae and a letter of support from a supervisor or senior colleague.

7. Awardees shall only be eligible to receive the travel bursary once.

8.  Candidates are not eligible for another prize at the Congress.

9. Bursaries are given by the Secretary General to each awarded colleague, at the Congress, after registration.

10. The presence of the recipient at the Closing ceremony is mandatory.

11. Applications will take place on the IAPD Congress website.

 

 

Email: IAPD@iapdworld.org for more information

 

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/poster-gallery/


In order to maximize the value of posters, we created a poster gallery for the collection of the posters presented in the congress. Have you missed some of the posters you were interested in during the congress? You can now view them at your desktop.

Three categories of competition posters are currently available from 2013 Seoul Congress:

The Morita Prize – Research Papers

The Morita Prize – Case Reports

The Jens Andreasen Awards


2013 Seoul Congress – Click here


2015 Glasgow Congress – Click here

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/poster-gallery/2013-seoul-congress/


Three categories of competition posters are currently available from 2013 Seoul Congress:

The Morita Prize – Research Papers

The Morita Prize – Case Reports

The Jens Andreasen Awards

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/poster-gallery/2013-seoul-congress/poster-gallery-the-morita-prize-2013/


Poster Gallery – The Morita Prize 2013 – Research-1

P12-337

Evaluation of clinical efficacy of indirect posterior.composites in children

P12-338

Toothpastes efficiency for decreasing Streptococcus mutans level in dental biofilm of young children

P12-339

Growth factor expression in dental stem cells: deciduous periodontal ligament and dental pulp

P12-340

Isolation, identification and characterization of lactic acid bacteria from preschool children and its correlation with dental caries

P12-341

Dental maturation in patients with dental agenesis

P12-342

An audit of dental treatmentof children under conscious sedation at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital

P12-343

Revascularization for necrotic immature permanent teeth: a retrospective study

P12-344

Management and mRNA activity of hereditary gingival fibromatosis

P12-345

Presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in saliva and cardiac tissue samples of children with congenital heart disease

P12-346

Developing guideline for caries prevention and management by caries risk assessment for pre-school children using adapte process and delphi consensus

P12-347

Factors affecting symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescents

P12-348

Seckel syndrome manifestations and dental care

P12-349

Effect of single-dose amoxicillin onrat incisor odontogenesis

P12-350

Three-dimensional changes in maxillofacial and alveoler base during rapid maxillary expansion in mixed dentition

P12-351

Comparative evaluation of indirect composite onlays vs stainless steel crowns for rehabilitation of grossly decayed primary molars

P12-352

Shifts in the microbial diversity during transition from caries-free to caries-active in 3-year old children

P12-353

Effects of lead exposure on proliferation and differentiation of stem cells isolated from bone marrow and dental origin

P12-354

Prevention of spontaneous abscesses of permanent teeth in x-linked hypophosphatemia

P12-355

Effects of maternal occlusal stress on hippocampal neurogenesis in sam mouse pups

P12-356

Relationship of salivary leptin concentrations and tooth development in obese children

Poster Gallery – The Morita Prize 2013 – Research-2

P12-357

Fluoride mouthrinses during orthodontic treatment in cleft patients: a national survey

P12-358

Effects of mechanical and thermal aging on microleakage of new flowable composite

P12-359

Genome-wide analysis of MSX1 target genes in stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth

P12-360

Oral health in preschool children with autism spectrum disorders: a case–control study

P12-361

Stem cells from inflamed human deciduous dental pulp: its characteristics and potential

P12-362

Therapeutic effect of hard tissue by lentiviral gene therapy for hypophosphatasia

P12-363

The effect of in vitro osteogenic induction on in vivo hard tissue forming potential of the dental pulp

P12-364

Complications of primary canine enucleation performed in sub-Saharan Africa

P12-365

Influence of type of feeding on levels of salivary immunoglobulin a (SIgA) in preterm neonates

P12-366

Body adiposity status in relation to dental caries experience among preschool children in Hong Kong

P12-367

Effects of finger sucking on the lower dental arches in the primary dentition: three-dimensional dental arch and alveolar ridge form analysis

P12-368

Factors affecting spontaneous space closure after the extraction of first permanent molars

P12-369

The evaluation shear bond strength of four different self-etching adhesive systems on dentine in primary and permanent teeth: in vitro study

P12-370

‘ViscoStat’, ‘Pulpotec’ and ‘Trioxident’ as a pulpotomy medicaments in primary molars

P12-371

The oral health status in children with phenylketonuria in Belarus

P12-372

Free dental treatment for children of asylum seekers at Tsurumi University Dental Hospital

P12-373

Bonding ability of 4-meta primer used with 4-meta/ mma-tbb resin ‘bondfill sb’ to enamel and dentin: primary vs permanent teeth

P12-374

Gene expression analysis of the dental pulp in healthy and caries teeth

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/poster-gallery/2013-seoul-congress/poster-gallery-the-morita-prize-2013-2/


Poster Gallery – The Morita Prize 2013- Case Report-1

P12-310

Oral manifestation in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: a case report

P12-311

Infected tooth follicle in the maxilla of a neonate

P12-312

Benefits of early treatment using nasoalveolar molding in an infant with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate: a case report

P12-313

Calcifying fibroblastic granuloma: a case report

P12-314

Treatment of posterior scissor bite with fixed appliance: case reports

P12-315

Pulp revascularization of immature teeth with dens invaginatus and necrotic pulp tissue: case report

P12-316

Challenges in management of a case of gingival hyperplasia associated with type IV amelogenesis imperfecta

P12-317

Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome – novel and unreported oral findings

P12-318

A case report of subcutaneous emphysema during root canal treatment

P12-319

Management of severe displacement of lower anterior teeth with alveolar bone fracture in a child with 18 months (case report)

P12-320

Surgical exposure and traction of deep impacted mandibular first molar: a case report

P12-321

Unilateral open-bite caused by an impacted primary molar with ankylosis: a case report

P12-322

CBCT for the diagnosis and treatment planning of a 15 year old patient treated with guided bone regeneration and esthetic semi-temporary splint following tooth extraction

P12-323

Treatment of an impacted maxillary central incisor: a case report

P12-324

Decision-making and treatment of a severe form of ectopic erupted maxillary permanent first molars with de-impactor springs: a case report

P12-325

Dens in dente (invaginated teeth) associated with periapical periodontitis: report of three cases

P12-326

Treatment planning in a case of amelogenesis imperfecta

P12-327

Comprehensive management of severe early childhood caries (s-ECC) in an uncooperative pediatric dental patient using general anesthesia: a case report

P12-328

Prevention and management of aspiration and ingestion of foreign bodies in pediatric dentistry: case reports

P12-329

Infantile palatal mucormycosis: an extremely rare case report

Poster Gallery – The Morita Prize – Case Report-2

P12-330

A case report of apicectomy procedure with root end filling on a 12 year old with radicular cyst

P12-331

Preoperative simulation and predictability for the facial asymmetry of hemifacial microsomia Pruzansky grade I

P12-332

Revascularization of non-vital immature teeth – a case report

P12-333

Continued root development after replantation of traumatic avulsed incisor: a case report

P12-334

Chemical burn of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment

P12-335

Genetics aspect of hypodontia in twins

P12-336

Conscious sedation with oral-transmucosal midazolam: effect on anxiety levels of young pre-cooperative children during a class II restorative procedure

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/poster-gallery/2013-seoul-congress/poster-gallery-the-jens-andreasen-award/


Poster Gallery- The Jens Andreasen Award

P11-296

Multidisciplinary approach of a complicated crownroot fracture: use of localized CBCT for detection, diagnosis and treatment planning

P11-297

An interdisciplinary approach in the management of severe intrusion injuries in permanent anterior teeth

P11-298

Management of severe extrusive luxation with surgical repositiong and splinting: case report

P11-299

A surveillance to establish dental trauma database with informatic engineering approach

P11-300

Interdisciplinary approach in management of dental trauma in a young child

P11-301

Evaluation of Adiposed-derived stem cell replantation in dogs

P11-302

Primary tooth trauma: do you know what lies beneath?

P11-303

A case of the replantation of upper deciduous central incisors under the different condition of extraalveolar period

P11-304

Reattachment of anterior teeth fragments after traumatic dental injury involving multiple crown fractures: a case report

P11-305

Emergency dental treatment under sevoflurane sedation

P11-306

The effect of the antibiotics used for regenerative endodontics on cells survival

P11-307

Revascularization of non-vital immature teeth – a case report

P11-308

Continued root development after replantation of traumatic avulsed incisor: a case report

P11-309

The endodontic study for the control of resorption on outer root surface with dental trauma

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/poster-gallery/2015-glasgow-congress/


Underconstruction!

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https://iapdworld.org/congress-3/sam-harris-travel-bursaries/


Sam Harris Travel Bursaries

 

These bursaries are administered to delegates from developing nations, in order to facilitate their attendance at the IAPD Biennial Congress. 

IAPD is proud to state that these awards were made possible thanks to the donation
to the IAPD of Dr. Samuel Harris, one of the founders of the specialty of Paediatric Dentistry and of our
Association.

Up to 3 bursaries of US$ 1000 (One Thousand Dollars) each will be available for the IAPD Biennial Congress.

 

Sam Harris Travel Bursaries

Prizes are Valued at:
USD 1000 each

 

These awards will be administered for the next IAPD in-person Congress.

 

Rules

1. Applicants must be current members of the IAPD.

2. Applicants should upload a letter stating how the Bursary would be particularly helpful to them onto the Congress website.

3. Each application should be accompanied by a copy of a poster abstract submitted to the Congress.

4. Each application should be accompanied by short Curriculum Vitae and a letter of support from a supervisor or senior colleague.

5. Awardees shall only be eligible to receive the travel bursary once.

6. Candidates are not eligible for another prize at the Congress.

7. Bursaries are given by the Secretary General to each awarded colleague, at the Congress, after registration.

8. The presence of the recipient at the Closing ceremony is mandatory.

9. Applications will take place on the IAPD Congress website.

10. In order to upload your letter regarding the Bursary, the application, the short CV and the letter of support, it is required to provide your IAPD membership number.

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Follow us
On the social networks

Facebook

We want to connect. We welcome you to ask questions, send comments or contact us for any other reason. Our team is always happy to assist you.

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The IAPD Council

The Council of the IAPD consists of one voting Delegate representing each  National Member Society

A National Member Society may nominate one alternate delegate who can attend the Council Meeting and who will only vote if the Delegate is absent. All voting delegates to Council must hold current Individual Membership in IAPD.

The Council holds full power to pursue the objectives of the Association. Council meetings are held at least once every two years during the International Congress.

Council Meetings

2019 Cancun


2017 Santiago


2015 Glasgow


2013 Seoul


2011 Athens


2009 Munich


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General Information

Welcome to the IAPD20 Virtual, taking place 13-17 September 2020

In order to enjoy the variety of networking options, lectures and exhibition as an attendee in a virtual meeting, please read carefully the general instructions.

 


General Instructions

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/


Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the IAPD: History Wall

We would like to take you on a journey through time. Take a look at our special History Wall that commemorated the IAPD Golden Jubilee during the 2019 Congress that took place in Cancun, Mexico.  

See the History Wall


History of the IAPD

The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) was founded in 1969, under the name   “International Association of  Dentistry for Children”. It started with a  membership of 11 national societies and a supporting membership of 270 pediatric dentists, which has grown to 72 national societies and over 3000 members today. 

 

It was during the Kyoto Congress in 1991 that IADC changed its name adopting the title “International Association of Paediatric Dentistry”.

 

The aim of the Association was to act as an International Forum for certified pediatric dentists and general dental practitioners with an interest in treating children. 

 

Since that time the members and worldwide influence of the Association have expanded so that now, through its national societies it represents over 15,000 dentists.

Did you know…

 

Between 1994 and 1997, Dr. S. Gelbier published a series of ten articles on history of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry.

Even before the International Association of Dentistry for Children (IADC) was established, the first international symposium on Child Dental Health had been held in London, in April 1967.

Meeting of the International Forum on Children’s Dentistry and founding of the International Association of Dentistry for Children, June 1969

 

“It is a remarkable testament to those men and women who, over the years,
have worked hard to found organization for children’s dentists to meet and improve
their knowledge and skills, so that better care can be provided for their young patients.”

Dr. Stanley Gelbier
King’s College School of Medicine and Dentistry, England
IAPD History Part 1IAPD History Part 2
IAPD History Part 3IAPD History Part 4
IAPD History Part 5IAPD History Part 6
IAPD History Part 9IAPD History Part 10
IAPD History Part 7IAPD History Part 8
A 50-Year Perspective of the IAPD

Past Presidents of the IAPD

2017 Anna Maria Vierrou Greece
2015 Anthony Tzong-Ping Tsai Taiwan
2013 Jorge Luis Castillo Peru
2011 Eduardo Alcaino Australia
2009 Mark P. Hector UK
2007 Anna Fuks Israel
2005 Lisa Papagiannoulis Greece
2003 Hugo Furze Argentina
2001 Barry Scheer UK
1999 Richard P. Widmer Australia
1997 Donald Kohn USA
1995 Anna-Lena Hallonsten Denmark
1993 Sadahiro Yoshida Japan
1991 Elisha D. Ben-Zur Switzerland

 

1989 Franklin Pulver Canada
1987 Raymond K. Pauly Costa Rica
1985 Roger K. Hall Australia
1983 Ludwig Rinderer Switzerland
1981 Pal Toth Hungary
1979 Manuel M. Album USA
1977 Haim Sarnat Israel
1975 Michel Schouker France
1973 Sergio Fiorentini Italy
1971 Erik Kisling Denmark
1969 Arvid Syrrist Sweden


See the Current Board of Directors

Past Secretary Generals of the IAPD

2011-2015 Joseph Chan Hong Kong
1999-2011 Gerald Z. Wright Canada
1997-99 Goran Dahloff Sweden
1990-97 Mark P. Hector United Kingdom
1987-90 Alan H. Brook United Kingdom
1979-87 John J. Murray United Kingdom
1973-79 Gerald B. Winter United Kingdom
1969-73 David S. Berman United Kingdom

List of IAPD Honorary Members

The Constitution of the IAPD allows the Association to confer Honorary Membership on a small number of distinguished people who have made “extraordinary contributions” to realize the objectives of the Association. 

 

The decision is conferred by the Council on a two-thirds majority of people present and voting. Here we provide a list of of the men and women whose outstanding contributions to paediatric dentistry have been so acknowledged.

 

Paediatric dentistry has much for which to thank these remarkable individuals.

2019 Mark P. Hector UK
2017 Milton Houpt USA
2017 Göran Koch Sweden
2015 Lisa Papagiannoulis Greece
2015 Gerald  Z. Wright Canada
2015 Anna Fuks Israel
2007 Anna Lena Hallonsten Denmark
1999 Sadahiro Yoshida Japan
1996 Reg Andlaw UK
1993 Roger K. Hall Australia
1989 Samuel D. Harris USA
1983 Pal Toth Hungary
1983 Manuel M. Album USA
1981 Haim Sarnat Israel
1979 Gerald B. Winter UK
1977 Michel Schouker France
1975 Erik Kisling Denmark
1973 Sergio Fiorentini Italy
1971 David S. Berman UK
1971 Arvid Syrrist Sweden
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About The IAPD

The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) is a non-profit organization founded in 1969, with the objective to contribute to the promotion of the oral health for children around the globe.
The aim of the Association is to act as an International Forum for certified pediatric dentists and general dental practitioners with an interest in treating children.
The IAPD has now 73 National Member Societies and through them represents over 16,000 dentists and over 3000 individual members.

If you care for the promotion of the oral health of children join us!!!


Join Us

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/board-of-directors/


Board of Directors 2019-2021

Marcelo Bönecker

PRESIDENT
(Brazil)

Anna-Maria Vierrou

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
(Greece)

Ari Kupietzky

SECRETARY GENERAL
(Israel)

James Crall

HONORARY
EDITOR
(USA)

Young J. Kim

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(South Korea)

Figen Seymen

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(Turkey)

Norman Tinanoff

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(USA)

Marietjie Weakley

REPRESENTATIVE FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(South Africa)

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/board-of-directors/board-of-directors-iapd-board-directors-2015-2017/


Board of Directors 2015-2017

Anthony Tzong-Ping Tsai

PRESIDENT
(Taiwan)

Jorge Luis Castillo

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
(Peru)

Anna-Maria Vierrou

PRESIDENT ELECT
(Greece)

Ari Kupietzky

SECRETARY GENERAL
(Israel)

Anne O’Connell

HONORARY EDITOR
(Ireland)

Yasmi Crystal

REPRESENTATIVE
OF NATIONS
(USA)

Morenike Ukpong

REPRESENTATIVE
OF NATIONS
(Nigeria)

Taku Fujiwara

REPRESENTATIVE
OF NATIONS
(Japan)

Bernadette Drummond

REPRESENTATIVE OF NATIONS
(New Zealand)

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/board-of-directors/iapd-board-2017-2019/


Board of Directors 2017-2019

Anna-Maria Vierrou

PRESIDENT
(Greece)

Anthony Tzong-Ping Tsai

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
(Taiwan)

Marcelo Bönecker

PRESIDENT ELECT
(Brazil)

Ari Kupietzky

SECRETARY GENERAL
(Israel)

Anne O’Connell

HONORARY EDITOR
(Ireland)

Taku Fujiwara

REPRESENTATIVE
FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(Japan)

Bernadette Drummond

REPRESENTATIVE
FOR NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES
(New Zealand)

Norbert Krämer

REPRESENTATIVE
OF NATIONS
(Germany)

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/honorary-members-of-iapd/


List of IAPD Honorary Members

The Constitution of the IAPD allows the Association to confer Honorary Membership on a small number of distinguished people who have made “extraordinary contributions” to realize the objectives of the Association. 

The decision is conferred by the Council on a two-thirds majority of people present and voting. Here we provide a list of of the men and women whose outstanding contributions to paediatric dentistry have been so acknowledged.

Paediatric dentistry has much for which to thank these remarkable individuals.

2019 Professor Mark P. Hector UK
2017 Professor Milton Houpt USA
2017 Professor Göran Koch Sweden
2015 Professor Lisa Papagiannoulis Greece
2015 Professor Gerald Wright Canada
2015 Professor Anna Fuks Israel
2007 Dr. Anna Lena Hallonsten Denmark
1999 Professor Sadahiro Yoshida Japan
1996 Dr. Reg Andlaw UK
1993 Dr. Roger Hall Australia
1989 Dr. Samuel D. Harris USA
1983 Professor Pal Toth Hungary
1983 Dr. Manuel M. Album USA
1981 Dr. Haim Sarnat Israel
1979 Professor Gerald Winter UK
1977 Dr. M. Schouker France
1975 Professor Erik Kisling Denmark
1973 Professor Sergio Fiorentini Italy
1971 Professor David S. Berman UK
1971 Professor Arvid Syrrist Sweden
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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/objectives-and-structure/


The Objectives of the IAPD

The objectives of the IAPD are:

Forum

Dental Health

Scientific Meetings

Structural Overview

Council
Board of Directors
Standing Committees
Headquarters
Council

The Council of the IAPD consists of one voting Delegate representing each  National Member Society

A National Member Society may nominate one alternate delegate who can attend the Council Meeting and who will only vote if the Delegate is absent. All voting delegates to Council must hold current Individual Membership in IAPD. 

The Council holds full power to pursue the objectives of the Association. Council meetings are held at least once every two years during the International Congress.

Board of Directors

The Board of Directors is entrusted with the management and administration of the Association and is composed of:

The members of the Board are elected by the Council for a period of two years, and they meet formally at least once a year.

Standing Committees

The IAPD is proud to have 10 Standing Committees set up by the Board of Directors and approved by the Council. The numbers or composition of the committees are outlined in the Standing Orders.

These committees have a very important role as advisory bodies to the Board of Directors; their recommendations may be partially or fully taken into account by the Board for decision making on various IAPD matters.

Headquarters

IAPD Secretariat  | Association Manager : Loraine Lugasi

18 Avenue Louis Casai | c/o Paragon

CP 234, 1209 Geneva

Switzerland

Tel.: +41 (0) 22 533 09 48

Fax: +41 (0) 22 580 29 53

E-mail: iapd@iapdworld.org

Website: www.iapdworld.org

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/standing-committees/


IAPD Standing Committees

The IAPD is proud to have 10 Standing Committees set up by the Board of Directors and approved by the Council. The numbers or composition of the committees are outlined in the Standing Orders.

These committees have a very important role as advisory bodies to the Board of Directors; their recommendations may be partially or fully taken into account by the Board for decision making on various IAPD matters.

Executive Committee

Executive Committee


Members

Education Committee

Education Committee


Members

Finance Committee

Finance Committee


Members

Congress Site Selection and Coordination Committee

Congress Site Selection and Coordination Committee


Members

Constitution Review Committee

Constitution Review


Members

Membership Committee

Membership Committee


Members

Awards Committee

Awards Committee


Members

Nominations Committee

Nominations Committee


Members

Public Relations Committee

Public Relations Committee


Members

Science Committee

Science Committee


Members

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/structure/


Structural Overview

Board of Directors
Council
Standing Committees
Headquarters
Board of Directors

The Board of Directors is entrusted with the management and administration of the Association and is composed of:

The members of the Board are elected by the Council for a period of two years, and they meet formally at least once a year.

Council

The Council of the IAPD consists of one voting Delegate representing each  National Member Society

A National Member Society may nominate one alternate delegate who can attend the Council Meeting and who will only vote if the Delegate is absent. All voting delegates to Council must hold current Individual Membership in IAPD. 

The Council holds full power to pursue the objectives of the Association. Council meetings are held at least once every two years during the International Congress.

Standing Committees

The IAPD is proud to have 10 Standing Committees set up by the Board of Directors and approved by the Council. The numbers or composition of the committees are outlined in the Standing Orders.

These committees have a very important role as advisory bodies to the Board of Directors; their recommendations may be partially or fully taken into account by the Board for decision making on various IAPD matters.

Headquarters

IAPD Secretariat  | Association Manager : Loraine Lugasi 

18 Avenue Louis Casai | c/o Paragon

CP 234, 1209 Geneva

Switzerland

Tel.: +41 (0) 22 533 09 48

Fax: +41 (0) 22 580 29 53

E-mail: iapd@iapdworld.org

Website: www.iapdworld.org

Keep an eye on the IAPD website for updates regarding nominations for the 2021-2023 Board of Directors about 6 months before the next IAPD Congress in Maastricht, the Netherlands June 9-12 2021.

IAPD 2021
Congress Website

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https://iapdworld.org/the-iapd/council-meeting/


The Council of the IAPD consists of one voting Delegate representing each  National Member Society. The Council holds full power to pursue the objectives of the Association. The Council meetings are held at least once every two years during the International Congress.

A National Member Society may nominate an alternate delegate who can attend the Council Meeting and who will only vote if the Delegate is absent. All voting delegates to Council must hold current Individual Membership in IAPD.

Council Meetings

2019 Cancun


2017 Santiago


2015 Glasgow


2013 Seoul


2011 Athens


2009 Munich


Please login or Join IAPD to download the files

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NEWS

Tuesday, 1 December, 2020
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10:29
November e-News
15:51
October e-News
15:59
September e-News
15:09
August e-News

Welcome

The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) is a non-profit organization founded in 1969, with the objective to contribute to the promotion of the oral health for children around the globe.

The aim of the Association is to act as an International Forum for certified pediatric dentists and general dental practitioners with an interest in treating children.

The IAPD has now 72 National Member Societies and through them represents over 16,000 dentists and over 3000 individual members.

If you care for the promotion of the oral health of children join us!!!


Join Us!


Follow Us on Facebook

Upcoming Events

28th IAPD Congress

June 10-13, 2021 Virtual

29th IAPD Congress

June 14-17, 2023 Maastricht, Netherlands

2nd IAPD Global Summit

February/March 2022


More Events

COVID-19 Corner

VISIT THE IAPD Resource Centre

Read More
Go to the IAPD Resource Centre

Membership Benefits

Individual members of the IAPD enjoy exceptional benefits, like discounted registrations to all IAPD Congresses, and opportunity to apply to several Bursaries and Awards, access to a world of Education via more than 150 Online Videos and subscription to the IAPD Journal.

More so, our members get connected and informed about paediatric dentistry activities around the globe via our monthly E-News and our Annual Newsletter.

We call you to join our global community for a cavity free future for children.


Video Lecture Video Center


International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry


IAPD Webinars


IAPD Newsletter

E-News


More E-News

Announcements

Sign up to the E-News

IAPD has now 72 National Member  Societies and represents more than 15,000 dentists.

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https://iapdworld.org/iapd-lecture-video-center/


In order to provide our members with the most updated educational materials, IAPD has created a new IAPD Lecture Center. This initiative represents a major commitment of IAPD to promote children’s dental care in the international community.
IAPD members have free access to all the videos of the Lecture Center, Join Now.

Please note that these lectures express the views of lecturers and not necesarily those of IAPD.

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https://iapdworld.org/iapd-lecture-video-center/lecture-series-by-prof-anna-fuks/


 “New Trends and Materials in Pulp Therapy – Current Concepts and Controversies”.

Thanks to Prof. Anna Fuks for kindly share this lecture series with IAPD Members. The presentation was given at the Taiwan Academy of Pediatric Dentistry in 2012.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

Pulp Histology and Embryology

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

MTA and Conclusion of Vital Pulp Therapy

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

Pulp Histology and Embryology

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

MTA and Conclusion of Vital Pulp Therapy

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

Pulp Histology and Embryology

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

MTA and Conclusion of Vital Pulp Therapy

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

Pulp Histology and Embryology

Prof. Anna Fuks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHOmBV4js_E

MTA and Conclusion of Vital Pulp Therapy

Prof. Anna Fuks

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https://iapdworld.org/iapd-covid-19-resource-centre/


Work Together to Stay

We Are Here for You

IAPD is an international organization with members throughout the entire world. Each one of us is experiencing this new situation at the same time but with diverse realities. Many governments have restricted movements of its citizens. Schools have been closed, borders sealed, public and even family gatherings have been cancelled. The pediatric dental community is being challenged both professionally and financially with little guidance as to how to cope and act during these difficult times.

However, the IAPD as a community may support each other. We offer a variety of resources to keep you busy during the lock-down.


Video Library

IAPD members have free access to all the videos of the Lecture Centre, Join Now!


Webinars

We have scheduled several webinars to support you during lock-down. Enjoy this brand new membership benefit!


Consensus Recommendations

Reach a consensus on an internationally accepted definition for ECC


Infographics

Propose and publish recommendations as to how to promote childhood caries prevention worldwide

COVID-19 Update | 5 May 2020

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt3t1iWSIw4

By Ana Vukovic (Serbia), Luciane da Costa (Brazil) and Eduardo Alcaino (Australia).

The aim of this webinar is to share current Covid-19 information, which is topical and relevant to all countries. Although IAPD does not provide universal guidelines due to the number of member nations, there are several documents which do present important information which can be applied in developed, developing and underdeveloped countries. The use of full Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) in a country with resources varies significantly to other countries, where there is no access to most of this equipment. Some relevant literature on the subject will be presented and PDF documents shared with the participants.

Further Reading Material

Useful Links


IADR

International Association of Dental Research


WHO

World Health Organization


CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Staying Informed : Tips from the IAPD Science Committee

In many countries parents and children are confined together at home without a routine schedule. These conditions may result in lack of exercise and poor eating habits.

Here are a few tips for you to share with your patients’ parents:


For more information, check out IAPD’s Parent Section


See our helpful Infographics here


International Pulmonologist’s Consensus on COVID-19

IThe IAPD Science Committee would like to share with you some information related to dental practice that can be derived from an excellent resource “International Pulmonologist’s Consensus on COVID-19, Chief Editors Dr. Tinku Joseph (India) and Dr. Mohammed Ashkan (Iran). 

**Please note
In countries where COVID-19 is active, the IAPD advocates that dental practices be limited to emergencies. When possible, emergency dental care be addressed with antibiotics, pain medication, and temporary fillings; or referred to hospitals that have “on call” dental staff.


Download the full document here


The IAPD Encourages Social Distancing

We understand many of you may be feeling isolated as we are encouraged to distance ourselves from others and community events are cancelled. But remember, we are all in this together. We therefore want to urge you to continue to find ways to connect with your loved ones during this time; stay connected through the phone, emails, Zoom, Facebook, etc. Perhaps instead of saying “social isolation,” we could refer to “physical isolation.” Let’s support each other during this time of need.

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https://iapdworld.org/iapd-webinars/


Welcome to IAPD Webinars!

IAPD members now have a chance to join live webinars by guest speakers on a range of issues. 

The biggest, unique benefit of joining a live webinar is the way in which content is explained: unlike recordings or other online educational material, the presentation of a webinar is more intimate. It almost functions like a personal tutoring session with feedback, questions, and engagement between the audience and the presenters. 

 

Previous Webinars




View the Recording

We thank our sponsor Elevate Oral Care for supporting this webinar


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area




View the Recording

In the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area




View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area


View the Recording

in the IAPD Member Area

Disclaimer
The views presented in these webinars do not necessarily represent the IAPD’s position or recommendation.

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Two-year Membership Fee of IAPD

Individual Member

Post Graduate Individual Member


Click here to view the Membership Benefits

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Online Oral Health Resources

Organizations

 

National Member Societies

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Our Lectures

*A schedule will be update in due course

Improving Communication with New Generation Parents

Andreas Agouropoulos, Greece

TBD

Eduardo Alcaino, Australia

Zirconia Crowns, How and When?

Jorge Casian, Mexico

Endodontics in Young Permanent Teeth

Zafer Cehreli,Turkey

Parent refusal of topical fluoride in pediatric dentistry: causes, consequences, and clinical management

Donald L. Chi, USA

Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines- Why, What, & How?

Vineet Dhar, USA

TBD

Monty Duggal, Singapore

Pulp Therapy for Primary Teeth

Mani Ekambaram, New Zealan

Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars

Marlies Elfrink, The Netherlands

Are X-rays Still An Option in Paediatric Dentistry?

Juan F. Yepes,USA

Infant Oral Mutilation: The Silent Public Health/Child Abuse Issue

Arthur Kemoli, Kenya

Better Breathing, Better Sleep : It’s Never Too Early

Stanley Liu and Audrey Yoon, USA

The Understanding of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH)

Susana Morales Uribe, Costa Rica

Today’s Parenting Styles and the Etiology of Child Behavior in the Dental Setting

Amr Moursi, USA

Orthodontic Essentials for Paediatric Dentists

Ki Tae Park, Korea

Community-based Approach to Reducing Caries

Francisco Ramos-Gomez, USA

Understanding Bioactivity and S-PRG Technology for Help Solving Daily Pediatric Dentistry Concerns

Daniela Rios, Brazil

Remineralization Versus Sealing and Infiltration: The Good and The Evil or The First and Second Line in Early Caries Management?

Falk  Schwendicke, Germany

Management of Injuries to The Periodontal & Supporting Structures Following Trauma: An Evidence-based Approach ; Full Coverage or Extra Coronal Restorations in The Primary Dentition

Nikhil Srivastava, India

Keys to Practice Success

William Waggoner, USA

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https://iapdworld.org/meeting-programme/


Will be updated in due course

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https://iapdworld.org/membership/


IAPD members enjoy several benefits either as Individual Members or as National Member Societies.

Together,  we can all work towards a better oral health future for the children worldwide.

Our global family counts more than 3.000 individual members and 72 National Member Societies.

Join us to make our voice and mission stronger.

 


Log in to renew your membership

Individual Membership Benefits

National Member Society Membership Benefits

IAPD Biennial Congress

IAPD Lecture Center & IAPD Online Education Library

(over 140 video lectures)

International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry

Bursaries and Awards

IAPD Newsletter

IAPD Regional meetings

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https://iapdworld.org/membership-categories/


Membership Categories

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP

Standard individual membership is valid for 2-years. Join us for 5 years and only pay for 4. Join us for 10 years and only pay for 8!

Being a member of the IAPD, enables you to attend the International congresses at reduced cost, receive the International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry and keep in contact with the Association and other members through the newsletter. Other benefits include free access of IAPD Online Education Library, the ability to apply for Bursaries and Awards, participate in the TTEW outreach project, attend Council meetings and be eligible for the IAPD Board or form part of other Committees.

 


Would you like to Join Us? Click here

Postgraduate / Senior Membership

50% reduction

If you are post graduate student / resident in Paediatric Dentistry / Senior member, you can join IAPD at a reduced cost of 50%. It enables you to attend the International congresses, receive the International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry and keep in contact with the association and other members through the newsletter. Other benefits include free access of IAPD Online Education Library and the ability to apply for Bursaries and Awards.


Would you like to Join Us? Click here

Supported Membership

IAPD supported membership applies to individual members from less wealthy nations, based on World Bank data. To obtain supported membership, members will be requested to upload a copy of identification / proof of country of origin.


Would you like to Join Us? Click here


Read more about this Category

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https://iapdworld.org/membership-categories/iapd-supported-membership/


IAPD Supported Membership


Click here to visit the World Bank Website

2020 Fiscal Year | Low-Income Economies

Source
Retrieved from the World Bank Data Help Desk, May 2020: https://datahelpdesk.worldbank.org/knowledgebase/articles/906519-world-bank-country-and-lending-groups

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https://iapdworld.org/membership-categories/membership-benefits/


Individual Membership Benefits

National Member Society Membership Benefits

IAPD Biennial Congress

IAPD Lecture Center & IAPD Online Education Library

(over 140 video lectures)

International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry

Bursaries and Awards

IAPD Newsletter

IAPD Regional meetings

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https://iapdworld.org/membership-categories/two-year-membership-fee-of-iapd/


To stay close to its members and make sure that there is no disruption with the IJPD journal subscription from one year to another, IAPD now offers a two-year membership at a reduced rate, starting in 2013. i.e. 2013/2014

Two-year Membership Fee

Payment Options

1. Pay with your PayPal account or via a credit card after you login to the IAPD member section

2. Bank Transfer

If you do not have a PayPal Account, and you do not wish to pay via a credit card , you can make the payment for the membership via a bank transfer –

Below you can find our bank details:

Bank: Credit Swisse AG
CH-1211 Geneve 70
Account: 1671925-02
Currency: EURO
IBAN: CH7104835167192502000
Benefactor: International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD)

Please ensure all names are indicated and you have already submitted online and kindly send us (IAPD@iapdworld.org) a copy of the bank transfer (swift).
All bank charges are the responsibility of the payee.
Membership will not be confirmed unless the full payment has been received.

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https://iapdworld.org/membership-fees/


Membership Fee per Category

IAPD
POST GRADUATE

2-YEAR MEMBERSHIP
€ 60
00

– 50%

IAPD
SENIOR

2-YEAR MEMBERSHIP
€ 60
00

– 50%

IAPD
SUPPORTED MEMBER

2-YEAR MEMBERSHIP
€ 60
00

– 50%

IAPD
INDIVIDUAL MEMBER

2-YEAR MEMBERSHIP
€ 120
00

IAPD
5-YEAR MEMBERSHIP

INDIVIDUAL MEMBER
€300
€ 240
00

1 year free

IAPD
10-YEAR MEMBERSHIP

INDIVIDUAL MEMBER
€600
€ 480

2 years free

IAPD
NATIONAL SOCIETY

Membership
Starting at € 162
00

Click here of more Information

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https://iapdworld.org/my-account/


Login

Lost your password?

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/


IAPD has 72 National Member Societies from all continents, representing over 16.000 dentists working with children, adolescents and patients with special needs worldwide.

Be part of the largest international body of Paediatric Dentistry and join us now to give the children of the world a future full of bright smiles!

National Member Societies’ representatives  have the opportunity to interact and network, raise awareness on issues regarding Paediatric Dentistry, improve education and clinical practice in their region.

Each country can be represented only by one Society.

For more information on National Society Membership please contact us by completing the form below or contact the Association Manager directly at iapd@iapdworld.org.

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/apply-for-a-regional-meeting/


IAPD Regional Meetings

IAPD Regional Meetings are designed for Paediatric Dentists and practioners dealing with children’s oral health.

IAPD Regional Meetings are 2-3 day scientific events in a plenary setting and lectures are in oral presentation format with several invited speakers. These meetings can be a stand alone event or combined with a local national society meeting. It is also open for abstract submission to encourage poster presentations. We also welcome industry hands-on during the lunch breaks.

Nairobi 2019

Eindhoven 2018

Istanbul 2018

Moscow 2018

Johannesburg 2018

Philippines 2017

Dubai 2017

Taiwan 2016

Brazil 2015

China 2014

Russia 2014

BRAZIL 2013

RUSSIA 2012

INDIA 2010

How to apply for a Regional Meeting:

 

* Specific circumstances may be presented to the Secretary General for special consideration

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/apply-for-iapd-educational-activities/


IAPD Regional Meetings

Designed for Paediatric Dentists and Practitioners Dealing with Children’s Oral Health.

IAPD Regional Meetings are 2-3 day scientific events in a plenary setting and lectures are in oral presentation format with several invited speakers. These meetings can be a stand alone event or combined with a local national society meeting. It is also open for abstract submission to encourage poster presentations. We also welcome industry hands-on during the lunch breaks.

Kenya 2019

Eindhoven 2018

Turkey 2018

Moscow 2018

Johannesburg 2018

Dubai 2017

Philippines 2017

Taiwan 2016

Brazil 2015

China 2014

Russia 2014

BRAZIL 2013

RUSSIA 2012

INDIA 2010

How to Apply for a Regional Meeting

* Specific circumstances may be presented to the Secretary General for special consideration

The TTEW Project Is a “Teach the Teachers” Educational Programme

The TTEW has been designed for less wealthy nations as judged by World Bank data and/or the United Nations Human Index. TTEW is available to IAPD member nations requiring assistance to advance paediatric dentistry teaching in their countries.

We Work with You to Design a Tailor-Made Programme

Since its introduction, DENFAC, which is now called TTEW has made good progress. Workshops have been held in Romania, Turkey, Poland, China, Senegal,Peru and Kenya.

Are you interested in hosting TTEW in your country? Or would you like to participate as a workshop speaker / leader. Perhaps you are interested a corporate sponsor?

Contact the IAPD Secretariat
NOW

Email the IAPD Secretariat:  iapd@iapdworld.org

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/list-of-national-member-societies/


IAPD has 75 National Member Societies from all continents, representing over 16.000 dentists working with children, adolescents and patients with special needs worldwide.

Be part of the largest international body of Paediatric Dentistry and join us now to give the children of the world a future full of bright smiles!

National Member Societies’ representatives  have the opportunity to interact and network, raise awareness on issues regarding Paediatric Dentistry, improve education and clinical practice in their region. 

Each country can be represented only by one Society.

 

https://youtu.be/02bsxYPTKks

List of National Member Societies

Algerian Society of Pediatric Odontology (SAOP)

 
American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD)

 
Argentine Association of Dentistry for Children (AAON)

Association of Paediatric and Preventive Dentists of Serbia (UDPSS)

Represents: Serbia

Australian & New Zealand Society of Paediatric Dentistry (ANZSPD)

Austrian Society for Paediatric Dentistry (ÖGK)
 

Belgian Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (BAPD)

Bolivian Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SBO)

Brazilian Association of Paediatric Dentistry (ABOPED)

British Society of Paediatric Dentistry (BSPD)

Bulgarian Association of Paediatric Dentistry (BAPD)

Cambodian Association of Pediatric Dentistry

Canadian Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (CAPD)

Chilean Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SCHOP)

Chinese Society of Pediatric Dentistry (CSPD)

Colombian Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (ACOP)

Costa Rican Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (ACOP)

Croatian Society for Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry (CSPPD)

Cyprus Society of Paediatric Dentistry (CSPD)

Czech Society of Paediatric Dentistry

Dental Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina – Paediatric Dentistry Division
 

Dental Association of Russia, Section of Paediatric Dentistry (StAR)

Dominican Society of Dentistry for Children (SODONI)

Dutch Society for Pediatric Dentistry (NVvK)

Ecuadorian Association of Paediatric Dentistry (AEOP)

Egyptian Society for Pediatric Dentistry & Children with Special Needs (ESPSN)

Emirates Pediatric Dentistry Club (EPDC)

Employee Dentists’ Organisation (ATO) – Denmark

Finnish Dental Society Apollonia – Division of Paediatric Dentistry (FDSA-DPD)

French Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SFOP)

Georgian Association of Pediatric Dentistry (GAPD)

German Society of Paediatric Dentistry (DGKiZ)

Hellenic Society of Paediatric Dentistry (HSPD)

Hong Kong Society of Paediatric Dentistry (HKSPD)

Hungarian Association of Pedodontics & Orthodontics (HAPO)

Icelandic Paedodontic Society
 

Indian Society of Pedodontics & Preventive Dentistry (ISPPD)

Iranian Association of Pediatric Dentistry (IAPD)

Irish Society of Dentistry for Children (ISDC)

Israeli Society of Dentistry for Children (ISDC)

Italian Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SIOI)

Japanese Society of Pediatric Dentistry (JSPD)

Jordanian Society for Paediatric Dentistry (JSPD)

Kenya Association of Paediatric Dentists (KAPD)

Korean Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (KAPD)

 

Kuwait Pediatric Dentistry Association (KPDA)

Lebanese Society of Pediatric Dentistry

Macedonian Association of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry (MAPPD)

Malaysian Association of Paediatric Dentistry (MAPD)

Mexican Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AMOP)

Nepalese Association of Pediatric Dentistry (NAPD)

Nigerian Association of Paediatric Dentistry (NAPD)

Norwegian Association for Pedodontics (NFP)

Paedodontic Society of South Africa (PSSA)

Pakistan Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

Panamanian Association of Pediatric Dentistry (PAPD)

Paraguayan Society of Pediatric Dentistry and Prevention (SPOyP)

Peruvian Society of Pediatric Dentistry (SPO)

Philippine Pediatric Dental Society, Inc. (PPDSI)

Polish Dental Association, Section of Paediatric Dentistry (PDA-SPD)

Portuguese Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SPOP)

Puerto Rican Society of Pediatric Dentists (PRSPD)

Romanian National Association of Paediatric Dentistry (ANSPR)

Saudi Society of Pediatric Dentistry (SSPD)

Slovenian Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SSPD)

Spanish Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SEOP)

Swedish Society of Paediatric Dentistry (SPF)

Swiss Association for Paediatric Dentistry (SVK ASP)

Taiwan Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (TAPD)

Thai Society of Pediatric Dentistry (TSPD)

Tunisian Association of Paediatric Dentistry (ATOP)

Turkish Society of Paediatric Dentistry (TPD)

Ukrainian Association of Preventive and Paediatric Dentistry (UAPPD)

Uruguayan Society of Pediatric Dentistry (SUOP)

Venezuelan Society of Pediatric Dentistry (SVOP)

For more information on National Society Membership please contact us by completing the form below or contact the Association Manager directly at iapd@iapdworld.org.

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/national-society-events/


Webinars from our National Member Societies / Related Organizations

Sociedad Chilena de Odontopediatria

26 August 2020, 7pm UTC-4


Register here

Language: Spanish

Title: Odontología Mundial: hacia una Nueva Realidad

by Dr Yasmi O. Crystal

International Association of Dental Traumology

5 August 2020, 5pm EDT


Watch the Recording

Introducing the Revised 2020 IADT Guidelines for the Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries

by Liran Levin

Academia Colombiana de Odontologia Pediatrica

1-2 October 2020


Registration here

Language: Spanish

Title: Salud Oral Más allá de los dientes

 

Share Your Event with the IAPD

We encourage our National Member Societies to share their events on our website. What we need from you:

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/national-society-membership/


Join Our Multi-Cultural Family

National Societies represent the practice of Paediatric Dentistry of their country. National Societies’  representatives are members of the Council of the IAPD and participate in all decisions of the Association.


Would you like to Join Us? Click here

National Society Membership

IAPD has 72 National Member Societies from all continents, representing over 16.000 dentists working with children, adolescents and patients with special needs worldwide.

Be part of the largest international body of Paediatric Dentistry and join us now to give the children of the world a future full of bright smiles!

National Member Societies’ representatives  have the opportunity to interact and network, raise awareness on issues regarding Paediatric Dentistry, improve education and clinical practice in their region. 

Each country can be represented only by one Society.

 

National Societies’ Benefits

Interested in Joining the IAPD Family?

Fill out the National Society Membership Application Form below. We will verify that you are a current individual member before proceeding to review your society’s application. Please have your the society constitution, list of officers and logo at hand to upload at the end of the form.

Alternatively, click on the button below to download the National Society Membership Application Form and send it to the IAPD Secretariat at iapd@iapdworld.org accompanied by the society constitution, list of officers and logo (if applicable).

After receiving your application, the IAPD Secretariat will contact you if any further information is needed to proceed. 

The Secretary General will review and present the new application at the first Board of Directors Meeting following your application.

If the Board votes in favor of your application, the society will achieve Interim National Society Membership* which will enables the society to apply for regional meetings and Teach the Teachers’ Educational Workshops.

 

*The society will only be an official member after the International Council votes to accept or reject the Board of Directors’ recommendation at the next council meeting.The next council meeting will be held in 2021, the Netherlands. Until then, the society will not be required to pay National Society Member dues.


Click Here to Download the National Society Membership Application Form


Click Here to Complete the National Society Membership Application Form Online

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/national-society-membership-form/


Online National Society Membership Application Form

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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/update-your-associations-profile/


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https://iapdworld.org/national-member-societies/young-iapd/


Coming Soon!

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https://iapdworld.org/orders/


Orders

[echo_orders]

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https://iapdworld.org/education/


Worldwide Education Is One of The Most Important Objectives of IAPD

IAPD brings educational programs and renowned educators/ speakers to your country and your desktop

IAPD Video Lecture Centre

OCE Library

Teach the Teachers Educational Workshop
(TTEW)

IAPD Regional Meetings

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https://iapdworld.org/education/apply-for-ttew/


The TTEW Project Is a “Teach the Teachers” Educational Programme

The TTEW has been designed for less wealthy nations as judged by World Bank data and/or the United Nations Human Index. TTEW is available to IAPD member nations requiring assistance to advance paediatric dentistry teaching in their countries.

We Work with You to Design a Tailor-Made Programme

 

Since its introduction, DENFAC, which is now called TTEW has made good progress. Workshops have been held in Romania, Turkey, Poland, China, Senegal,Peru and Kenya.

Are you interested in hosting TTEW in your country? Or would you like to participate as a workshop speaker / leader. Perhaps you are interested a corporate sponsor? 

 

Contact the IAPD Secretariat
NOW

Email the IAPD Secretariat:  iapd@iapdworld.org

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https://iapdworld.org/education/guidelines-for-clinical-practice/


Visitors to this website will notice a new section, “Guidelines for Clinical Practice,” which will serve the members of IAPD by directing them to detailed guidelines for clinical practice. These comprehensive guidelines, developed by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) and the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) serve an important educational purpose for the practitioner. 

Although some guidelines apply more specifically to some geographic areas, most contain valuable information for practitioners wherever they might practice in the world.  When appropriate, they also serve to inform patients and their caregivers.

Background of Guidelines

More than thirty years ago, the  AAPD began production of Policies and Guidelines for clinical practice. An annual Reference Manual was produced for its members and it now contains more than 65 policies and guidelines for clinical practice. They are reviewed on a regular basis and revised when necessary.  Access to these policies and guidelines is readily available on the AAPD website (http://www.aapd.org/policies/)

In 1997, the  EAPD Board initiated the development of  “common recommendations and guidelines for providing dental care for children.” Since that time, six guidelines were produced. Access to those recommendations can be obtained from the EAPD website (www.eapd.eu) in the section Policies and Guidelines.

Featured Guidelines

Periodically, this IAPD website will bring to the attention of its members two or three policies or guidelines which should be reviewed. Last year, “Dental Home” and “Guidelines on Prevention of Early Childhood Caries” were featured. (Click on the links below for the guideline of your choice for review)

Dental Home (by AAPD)

Prevention of Early Childhood Caries (by EAPD)

 

 At this time two additional policies are brought to the reader’s attention:“Policy on early childhood caries(ECC): Classification, Consequences and Preventive Strategies” (available on the AAPD website) and “Guidelines for Best Clinical Practice on Molar-Incisor-Hypomineralisation (MIH)” (available on the EAPD website). Review of these policies will be a valuable contribution to the continuing education of a practitioner. 

Policy on Early Childhood Caries (ECC): Classification, Consequences, and Preventive Strategies (by AAPD)

Guidelines for Best Clinical Practice on Molar-Incisor-Hypomineralisation (MIH) (by EAPD) 

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https://iapdworld.org/education/ecc-declaration/


How it Happened…

The Early Childhood Caries (ECC) has been termed a silent epidemic. It is major global oral health problem affecting infants and preschool children worldwide. Global efforts are required to tackle this growing health challenge and to become more organized and prominent. 

The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) with over seventy national pediatric dentistry societies and representing worldwide more than sixteen thousand dentists is the ideal setting to achieve this type of global cooperation. 

Step 1

Establish a common language to allow clinicians and scientists dealing with ECC to properly communicate

Step 2

Meet at the IAPD Global Summit in Bangkok, Thailand

Step 3

Reach a consensus on an internationally accepted definition for ECC

Step 4

Propose and publish recommendations as to how to promote childhood caries prevention worldwide

The Expert Panel

The Global Summit brought together experts and world leaders involved in the area of ECC. An international group of eleven authorities from across the globe convened under the auspices of the IAPD prepared an expert report. The report was presented to over four hundred delegates from over fifty countries.

A consensus was reached and summarized in an official declaration entitled: Early Childhood Caries: IAPD Bangkok Declaration.

The declaration facilitates the exchange of information and expertise across national borders and concurrently link policy makers, academics, and activists.

In addition to the declaration, an open access supporting scientific manuscript is available.


View the Scientific Manuscript


View the ECC Declaration

Have You Seen the

Have You Seen the

Previous
Next

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https://iapdworld.org/education/iapd-infographics/


Enjoy and Share the IAPD Infographics

IAs dentists treating children we all miss our patients, our interactions with them, the lack of satisfaction in making a difference in their lives and health.


During these difficult times it is important for us to keep in touch with the children and their parents. The IAPD Public Relations Committee has prepared a series of infographics for you to share with them. Our infographics are both visual and informative. The message is communicated through child-friendly graphics and simple verbal messages, for parents to discuss with their children about their oral health.

Please enjoy and share with your patients and colleagues. Feel free to post on social media and get the word out.

 

Infographic 1

Infographic 2

Infographic 3

Infographic 4

See the Translations Available
(in Collaboration with our National Member Societies)

This is Section is a Work in Progress
This section is currently being updated – please check back in a day or two for more information

Association of Paediatric & Preventative Dentists of Serbia

Brazilian Assoctiation of Paediatric Dentistry

Cambodian Society of Pediatric Dentistry

Chinese Society of Pediatric Dentistry

Dutch Society of Paedtiaric Dentistry

Egyptian Society for Pediatric Dentistry & Children with Special Needs

German Society of Paediatric Dentsitry

Indian Society of Pedodontics & Preventative Dentsitry

Iranian Association of Pediatric Dentistry

Israeli Society of Dentistry for Children

Italian Society of Paediatric Dentistry

Hellenic Society of Paediatric Dentistry

Romanian National Association of Paediatric Dentistry

Taiwan Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

Turkish Society of Paediatric Dentistry

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https://iapdworld.org/education/iapd-lecture-video-center/


In order to provide our members with the most updated educational material, we created the IAPD Video Lecture Centre. This initiative represents a major commitment of IAPD to promote children’s dental care in the international community.

IAPD members have free access to all the videos of the Lecture Center, Join Now.

Disclaimer
The views presented in these videos do not necessarily represent the IAPD’s position or recommendation.”

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https://iapdworld.org/education/iapd-regional-meetings/


Designed for Paediatric Dentists and Practitioners Dealing with Children’s Oral Health.

IAPD Regional Meetings are 2-3 day scientific events in a plenary setting and lectures are in oral presentation format with several invited speakers. These meetings can be a stand alone event or combined with a local national society meeting. It is also open for abstract submission to encourage poster presentations. We also welcome industry hands-on during the lunch breaks.

Kenya 2019

Eindhoven 2018

Turkey 2018

Moscow 2018

Johannesburg 2018

Dubai 2017

Philippines 2017

Taiwan 2016

Brazil 2015

China 2014

Russia 2014

BRAZIL 2013

RUSSIA 2012

INDIA 2010

How to Apply for a Regional Meeting

* Specific circumstances may be presented to the Secretary General for special consideration

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https://iapdworld.org/education/learn-how-to-use-oce-library/


The IAPD OCE library supported by CSPD has rebulit the OCE portal and have a new link to an updated OCE library. IAPD members will need to register again for the new link. Please sign in to enjoy the educational resources.  

4 Easy Steps to Access the OCE Library

Step 1:

Member Login or Join IAPD
login to your IAPD member section

Step 2:

obtain your password for access to CSPD OCE

the OCE password is different from your IAPD account password

Step 3:

Register

go to CSPD OCE website and sign up for a new account, 
remember to check the box to indentify yourself as an IAPD member 

Step 4:

Login to view the videos

login with registered email and the OCE password

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https://iapdworld.org/education/online-continuing-education-oce-library/


Online Continuing Education (OCE) Library

Over 45 video presentations with PowerPoint slides and word-to-word text for effective and efficient learning ! Free access for IAPD members.

The IAPD and the California Society of Pediatric Dentistry have an ongoing arrangement which enables IAPD members to free access of the CSPD Online Education library. 

IAPD members worldwide have the opportunity to access continuing education through a variety of rich media programs that include streaming video/audio, Power Point slides, scrolling text, and video search.

Titles  in the IAPD OCE Library include: 


Join now




Click here to go to the OCE Library

IAPD thanks the California Society of Pediatric Dentistry for their continued support of promoting Paediatric Dentistry education worldwide.

Learn How to Use the OCE Library

The IAPD OCE library supported by CSPD has rebulit the OCE portal and have a new link to an updated OCE library. IAPD members will need to register again for the new link. Please sign in to enjoy the educational resources.   


Step 1

Login to the IAPD Member Section

Step 2

Obtain your password for access to CSPD OCE
(the OCE password is different from your IAPD account password)


Step 3

Go to the CSPD OCE website and sign up for a new account, remember to check the box to indentify yourself as an IAPD member

Step 4

Login with registered email and the OCE password

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https://iapdworld.org/education/iapd-education-fund/


The IAPD Education Fund

Why is the IAPD Education Fund Needed?

IAPD cannot provide education programs without funding assistance. Contributions to the Education Fund are critical for these projects to move forward. The IAPD Education Fund has been formed to govern the funds for the Teach the Teachers Educational workshops and the IAPD Regional Meetings. Recently we have expanded our educational activities by creating an E-learning section which includes the IAPD Video Lecture Centre and IAPD Webinars.

 

All contributions to the Education Fund will be used solely to assist dental education for children separated from any other IAPD operating funds.

Support the IAPD

The outbreak of COVID-19 has been a catalyst for the growth of the e-learning segment, including e-learning platforms, webinars, and virtual events. Online content is now more relevant than ever.

IAPD is keeping up with the times and launched a new website to showcase our strengths and reflect our mission: to promote the best practice of paediatric dentistry in the world. Our brand-new website is updated and designed to be responsive (mobile-friendly) to provide better surfing experience on all platforms.

The IAPD provides downloadable resources and hosts a range of educational events. With the launch of IAPD webinars in 2020, members can learn right from their desk chair. We thank our Education Committee for their continuous work on initiating this new form of learning.

Like the IAPD, many scientific societies are embracing new social media (SM) technology and are aware of their impact on the growth and development of a society. Since 2020, IAPD has increased its presence on social media to expand its reach. 

 

You can be a partner to the IAPD in its mission to reach more paediatric dentists online. Contact iapd@iapdworld.org now to discuss this opportunity.

There are several ways in which you could become part of our mission:

Don’t See Anything that You Like?

This is a two-way conversation and we are ready to talk about unique, tailor-made opportunities that suit your exact needs.

Don’t like a feature of one of our packages? We will remove it and adjust the price. Do you have a new idea? Share it with us.

The IAPD has 9 active committees that are involved with many innovate projects. Contact us for more information on how you can get involved.

We are ready to talk about what you need to become a true partner.

Email us now at iapd@iapdworld.org

Download the Prospectus


We Thank Our Current Supporters


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https://iapdworld.org/education/teach-the-teachers-educational-program-ttew/


The TTEW Project Is a “Teach the Teachers” Educational Programme

Congresses provide for the interchange of paediatric dentistry knowledge, but are less likely to be available to many dentists from economically challenged countries. For this reason, in 2000 the association developed an outreach programme. ‘Dentists for All Children’ (DENFAC) was launched at the 2001 Paris Congress to enhance paediatric dental education in lower and lower middle‐income countries as defined by World Bank data and/or the United Nations Human Index. 

The project introduces teachers of dental students to contemporary knowledge, techniques, and standards by providing a series of lectures and clinical teaching sessions. It was initially seeded with funds from the Dr Samuel D. Harris Foundation and later sponsored by leading corporate partners.

The programme was revitalized as The “IAPD Teach the Teachers Educational Workshop” In 2018

TTEW is available to IAPD member nations requiring assistance to advance paediatric dentistry teaching in their countries.

We Work with You to Design a Tailor-Made Programme

Since its introduction, DENFAC, which is now called TTEW has made good progress. Workshops have been held in Romania, Turkey, Poland, China, Senegal,Peru and Kenya.

Those interested in participating in TTEW, to receive the project in your nation, to participate as workshop speakers-leaders, or to gain information about being a corporate sponsor should write or e-mail to the IAPD at iapd@iapdworld.org.

How to Apply for a TTEW

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https://iapdworld.org/our-speakers/


Andreas Agouropoulos, Greece

Improving Communication with New Generation Parents

Eduardo Alcaino, Australia

TBD

Jorge Casian, Mexico

Zirconia Crowns, How and When?

Zafer Cehreli,Turkey
Endodontics in Young Permanent Teeth

Donald L. Chi, USA

Parent refusal of topical fluoride in pediatric dentistry: causes, consequences, and clinical management

Vineet Dhar, USA

Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines- Why, What, & How?

Monty Duggal, Singapore

TBD

Mani Ekambaram, New Zealan

Pulp Therapy for Primary Teeth

Marlies Elfrink, The Netherlands

Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars

Juan F. Yepes,USA

Are X-rays Still An Option in Paediatric Dentistry?

Arthur Kemoli, Kenya

Infant Oral Mutilation: The Silent Public Health/Child Abuse Issue

Stanley Liu and Audrey Yoon, USA

Better Breathing, Better Sleep : It’s Never Too Early

Susana Morales Uribe, Costa Rica

The Understanding of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH)

Amr Moursi, USA

Today’s Parenting Styles and the Etiology of Child Behavior in the Dental Setting

Ki Tae Park, Korea

Orthodontic Essentials for Paediatric Dentists

Francisco Ramos-Gomez, USA

Community-based Approach to Reducing Caries

Daniela Rios, Brazil

Understanding Bioactivity and S-PRG Technology for Help Solving Daily Pediatric Dentistry Concerns

Falk  Schwendicke, Germany

Remineralization Versus Sealing and Infiltration: The Good and The Evil or The First and Second Line in Early Caries Management?

Nikhil Srivastava, India

Management of Injuries to The Periodontal & Supporting Structures Following Trauma: An Evidence-based Approach ; Full Coverage or Extra Coronal Restorations in The Primary Dentition

William Waggoner, USA

Keys to Practice Success

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https://iapdworld.org/parents/


Parents want the best for their children ~ including good oral health


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Throughout the world, parents want the best for their children, and this includes good oral health that will provide them with a beautiful smile.
The basis for good oral health at all ages lies in:

  1. A healthy, well balanced diet, rich in natural ingredients and limiting the foods and drinks with added sugars. Cavities grow when sweet foods and starches or their left-overs stay in the mouth for long periods of time. Limiting snacking to fruits and vegetables and eating naturally sweet foods and drinks with meals are recommended to avoid cavities and staying healthy.
  2. Helping your child brush the teeth twice a day with an age appropriate amount of fluoride toothpaste from the eruption of the first tooth.
  3. Establish a dental home when the child grows the first tooth or by the first birthday. A dental home is a continuous relationship with a dental practitioner where the child can receive all the care they could need.

Not surprisingly, parents often have other questions about gaining and maintaining the oral health of their children.
We have divided the questions and answers into periods from birth to age 2, the preschool period from ages 3 to 6, the early mixed dentition period from ages 6 to 9, and the late mixed dentition stages from 10 years and upwards.

Children 0-2 years of ageChildren 2-5 years of age
Children 6-10 years of ageChildren 10+ years of age

About the book: Let Me Ask You, Doc

The format of this section is based on a book written by by A/Prof. Richard P. Widmer and Professor Emeritus Gerald Z. Wright for the 20th Congress of the International Association of Dentistry Congress, Sydney, Australia. The content and recommendations have been updated (December, 2016) as to provide the latest information based on scientific evidence concerning the oral health of children. Revisions were done by the Scientific Committee of IAPD: Dr. Carolina Medina (Venezuela), Dr. Kevin Donly (USA), Dr. Seung-June Jeon (Korea), Dr. Martine Van Germet-Schriks (Neatherlands), Dr. Lola Orenuga (Nigeria), Dr Luciane Costa (Brazil), Dr. Anna Fuks (Israel), Dr. Jan Ching Chun Hu (USA), Dr. Nicky Kilpatrick (Australia). Chaired by Dr. Yasmi O Crystal (USA) and edited by Dr. Anne O’Connell (Ireland)

Los padres quieren lo mejor para sus hijos – incluyendo buena salud oral

En todo el mundo, los padres quieren lo mejor para sus hijos, y esto incluye una buena salud bucal que les proporcionará una hermosa sonrisa.
La base para una buena salud oral en todas las edades radica en:

  1. Una dieta saludable y bien balanceada, rica en ingredientes naturales y que limite los alimentos y bebidas con altas cantidades de azúcares. Las caries crecen cuando los alimentos dulces, con almidones o sus restos permanecen en la boca durante largos períodos de tiempo. Para evitar las caries y mantener una buena salud bucal se recomienda limitar los refrigerios entre comidas a solamente frutas y verduras y comer los alimentos y bebidas naturalmente dulces durante las comidas.
  2. Ayudando a su niño a cepillarse los dientes dos veces al día con pasta de dientes con 1000 ppm de fluoruro, usando una cantidad apropiada para su edad a partir de la erupción del primer diente.
  3. Establecer un hogar dental cuando al niño le erupcione el primer diente o al primer cumpleaños. Un hogar dental es una relación continua con un dentista donde el niño recibe todo el cuidado que necesita.

No es sorprendente que los padres a menudo tengan otras preguntas sobre cómo conseguir y mantener la salud bucal de sus hijos.
Se dividieron las preguntas y respuestas en períodos desde el nacimiento hasta la edad de 2 años, el período preescolar de 3 a 6 años, el período de dentición mixta temprana de edades 6 a 9 y las etapas de dentición mixta tardía de 10 años en adelante.

El formato de esta sección está basado en un libro escrito por los profesores Richard P. Widmer y Emeritus Gerald Z. Wright para el 20avo Congreso de la Asociación Internacional de Odontología, llevado a cabo en Sydney, Australia. El contenido y las recomendaciones se han actualizado (diciembre de 2016) con el fin de proporcionar la información más reciente basada en pruebas científicas relativas a la salud oral de los niños. Las revisiones fueron hechas por el Comité Científico de la Asociación Internacional de Odontología Pediátrica: La Dra. Carolina Medina (Venezuela), el Dr. Kevin Donly (EUA), el Dr. Seung-June Jeon (Corea), la Dra. Martine Van Germet-Schriks (Países Bajos), la Dr. Lola Orenuga (Nigeria), la Dra. Luciane Costa (Brasil), la Dra. Anna Fuks (Israel), el Dr. Jan Ching Chun Hu (EUA), la Dra. Nicky Kilpatrick (Australia). Presidido por la Dra. Yasmi O Crystal (EUA) y editado por la Dra. Anne O’Connell (Irlanda).

Os pais querem o melhor para seus filhos – inclusive quando s trata de saúde bucal

Em todo o mundo, os pais querem o melhor para seus filhos, e isso inclui boa saúde bucal, que irá garantir um belo sorriso aos seus filhos.
A base para uma boa saúde bucal, em todas as idades da criança consiste em:

  1. Uma dieta saudável, bem equilibrada, rica em ingredientes naturais, com limitação da ingestão de alimentos e bebidas açucarados. Cárie dentária ocorre quando doces e amido permanecem na boca por longos períodos de tempo. Limitar laches as frutas e vegetais, comer alimentos naturais e beber durante as refeições são recomendações que podem evitar o desenvolvimento de cáries e favorecer a saúde da cavidade bucal.
  2. Ajudar o seu filho a escovar os dentes duas vezes por dia com uma quantidade adequada de pasta de dente com flúor a 1000 ppm a partir da erupção do primeiro dente.
  3. Estabelecer visitas dentais no surgimento do primeiro dente ou no primeiro aniversário da criança. Estas visitas consistem no desenvolvimento de um relacionamento contínuo com um dentista onde a criança irá receber todo o cuidado necessário.

Não surpreendentemente, os pais muitas vezes têm outras perguntas sobre como manter a saúde bucal de seus filhos
Dividimos as perguntas e respostas em períodos que abrange o nascimento até os 2 anos de idade, o pré-escolar que envolve crianças de 3 a 6 anos, da dentição mista, abrangendo 6 a 9 anos de idade, e, os estádios de dentição mista tardia, que ocorre a partir de 10 anos.

O formato desta seção é baseado no livro escrito pelo Prof. Richard P. Widmer e Professor Emérito Gerald Z. Wright para o 20º Congresso da Associação Internacional de Odontologia, Sydney, Austrália. O conteúdo e as recomendações foram atualizados (Dezembro de 2016) para fornecer as informações mais recentes baseadas em evidências científicas sobre a saúde bucal das crianças. As revisões foram feitas pelo Comitê Científico da IAPD: Dra. Carolina Medina (Venezuela), Dr. Kevin Donly (EUA), Dr. Seung-June Jeon (Coréia), Dr. Martine Van Germet-Schriks (Neatherlands), Dra. Lola Orenuga (Nigéria), Dra. Luciane Costa (Brasil), Dra. Anna Fuks (Israel), Dr. Jan Ching Chun Hu (EUA), Dra. Nicky Kilpatrick (Austrália). Presidido pela Dra. Yasmi O Crystal (EUA) e editado pela Dra. Anne O’Connell (Irlanda).

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https://iapdworld.org/parents/children-0-2-years-of-age/



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Frequently Asked Questions

When does the first tooth come in?

The first tooth usually comes in around 6 months of age. Most often it is a lower front tooth. The tooth eruption timing of primary teeth is more variable than for permanent teeth. The front 8 teeth (4 on top and 4 on bottom) usually have come in by 9-12 months of age.

When should I start cleaning my baby’s teeth?

The simple answer is that teeth should be cleaned as soon as the first tooth first appears. Brushing your baby’s teeth with a size appropriate toothbrush and with full strength fluoride toothpaste (1000 ppm) has proven to be the best protection against tooth decay. Children 0-3 years should use a size of a grain of rice of fluoride toothpaste. Training toothpastes offer NO protection against tooth decay.

What is the best way to clean a baby’s mouth?

​Before teeth erupt, parents can use a clean, small gauze pad or a clean dry wash cloth. The teeth and gums are wiped to remove liquid and food debris. This can be done before bedtime. As soon as the child gets the first tooth, a small, soft toothbrush can be used to clean the all surfaces of the teeth, paying special attention to the grooves on the chewing surfaces of the molars as well as the gums and tongue, using the amount of Fluoride toothpaste shown above. When the child is old enough, parents should teach and encourage spitting out the toothpaste. Rinsing thoroughly is not necessary. Studies show that the best protection against cavities is to brush and spit. Parents should always supervise the toothbrushing routine on young children.

Should I worry about my baby swallowing the toothpaste?

If you are using no more than the size of a grain of rice of Fluoride toothpaste twice a day, it is safe if the baby swallows it. The very small amount has been calculated to be safe even for a 6 month old. However, it is easy to wipe the excess toothpaste away with a clean gauze or towel while you brush your baby’s teeth.

When do primary (baby) teeth erupt?

What age should a child have the first dental check up?

Visiting a dentist when the first tooth erupts or by the first birthday is recommended to help reduce the number of infants and children who suffer from preventable tooth decay.
Why? Seeing the child early gives the dentist the opportunity to examine the mouth and confirm normal oral development. Most importantly, the teeth can be examined for cleanliness. It gives the dentist the opportunity to provide advice on prevention and make the best care plan for your child. It also gives parents the chance to discuss feeding practices, teething and mouth habit. If the child is determined to be at risk of getting cavities, the dentist can apply extra preventive measures like Fluoride varnish. The best plan is to prevent problems from happening rather than to fix problems once they do.

Does my baby need a fluoride application at the dentist?

Many babies get cavities soon after their teeth grow into their mouth, as we discuss in question 13. When children are at risk of having cavities, an application of fluoride varnish at the dentist can make their teeth stronger. When you take your child for a dental visit at age 1, and every six months after that, your dentist can evaluate if your child is at risk of having cavities, or already having early signs of having cavities. In that case applying fluoride varnish is an easy, safe and very effective method to protect your baby’s teeth. When children already have the beginning of cavities, applying fluoride varnish every 3 months can prevent the cavities from growing larger, and can even reverse the process. Talk to your dentist about your child’s individual needs for fluoride applications.

When do you think my child should give up the bottle?

For those babies not being breast fed, there is general agreement that around one year of age is a good time to wean baby from the bottle. Pediatric dentists like to see children give up bottles as soon as possible. That is because they see an alarming number of toddlers with Early Childhood Caries. This type of decay, which begins on the front teeth, can result from prolonged use of a milk or sweetened liquid bottle, or when it is put into bed with the baby. Same thing can happen when the baby drinks sweet liquids from a sippy cup.

Weaning from the bottle seems to follow two paths. The first is stopping the bottle suddenly. It is a “cold turkey” approach. The second method is a gradual reduction in the usage of the bottle. Reduction usually begins during the day when baby is able to drink from a cup. The last and most difficult bottle to be discontinued is the bottle before bedtime.

Parents should keep in mind that it is not the bottle or the sippy cup that cause the problem. It is the sweet drinks in them that can cause cavities. If your baby has to suck from a bottle or a sippy cup after the teeth erupt, the best is to put only WATER in them. This approach also helps by creating the healthy habit of drinking water rather than sweet drinks.

Which measures should I take if I am nursing my baby?

Nursing is the natural and healthiest form of nurturing for both mommy and baby. It is recommended as the ideal form of infant nutrition by Pediatricians and the medical community. Before the baby grows teeth, following the schedule recommended by your pediatrician is the best. Once the baby grows the first tooth, start brushing twice a day with the size of a grain of rice of Fluoride toothpaste, and try to minimize night feedings. Mother’s milk has sugars that have the potential to start cavities when left in the mouth for extended periods of time. Babies that have teeth and are nursed at-will through the night, can develop cavities as severe as those produced by a nursing bottle.

 

Do you think it is O.K. to use a pacifier?

Sucking is a basic instinct of infants. Over the years there have been numerous debates as to the usefulness of pacifiers. The benefits attributed to them seem to outweigh any potential shortcomings for children younger than 2. If it helps to comfort your baby then use the pacifier. Be certain to use pacifiers with a large flange that sits on the outside of the mouth and an oval shaped teat. This type of pacifier is recommended for safety and better dental development.

 

Could my child’s temperature be from teething?

For years many thought that teething caused fever and general sickness. Teething has been blamed for many things! Research into the problems of teething has shown that some children become irritable, have increased drooling and sometimes a facial rash. However, for most children the effect of teething is teeth! It is a normal part of development. If your child has a high temperature that worries you, it is unlikely to be caused by teething and you should consult your physician.

What do you recommend for teething?

Many remedies have been suggested over the years. There are non-medical things that can help. Teething rings have been found to be helpful for some babies. The biting pressure seems to relieve some discomfort especially if the teething ring is chilled. Another easy alternative is to use a clean, wet towel placed in the freezer that can offer a soft cold surface for the baby to chew. Pain relief tablets and special local anesthetic medicines available for this purpose should be left as a last resort.

Why do some children get tooth decay before they are two years old?

About 1 in 10 children experience tooth decay before they are two years old. In certain communities that number can be much higher. The most common cause is when a baby is placed in the crib at night with a bottle of milk or sweetened liquid. The contents of the bottle cling to the teeth all night. Tooth decay begins! The same effect can occur with a sweetened pacifier. In rare circumstances, babies who are breast fed throughout the night over a long time are also at risk. The decay experienced by these toddlers has a typical pattern. It usually is evident near the gum line of the upper front teeth. Because of the age of these children, treatment becomes a major problem sometimes even requiring general anesthesia. Parents need to be alert and keep the teeth healthy by brushing twice a day with the size of a grain of rice of fluoride toothpaste as soon as the first tooth erupts. Occasionally when illness or some other disturbance affects growing teeth, the quality of the enamel is poor. These teeth can decay early and more easily. A dental examination around one year of age helps identify these problems, and allows your dentist to implement additional preventive measures, like the professional application of fluoride varnish.

What can be done about my child grinding teeth at night?

Some children grind their teeth at night. It is a habit called bruxism. It is not unusual in the early years, especially in periods when the children are growing new teeth. We know that this really worries parents but it rarely requires treatment.
The grinding habit is usually minor and only in rare occasions it will cause the teeth to wear teeth significantly. Regular visits to the dentist will allow to evaluate the wear and establish preventive measures to limit damage to the teeth.

Are primary teeth important?

For years the importance of primary teeth was underrated. Once their importance was recognized, permanent teeth improved. There are the obvious reasons why primary teeth are important – chewing, speaking, and appearance. Primary teeth do more. They conserve the space in the jaws for permanent teeth. If primary teeth are removed ahead of their natural time to fall out, space for the second teeth may be lost. Children who have had caries in their primary teeth have many more chances to have cavities in their permanent teeth. Establishing good habits that prevent tooth decay in primary teeth paves the way to a lifetime with a healthy mouth.

Do injuries to the primary teeth affect the permanent teeth?

Many children have unfortunate accidents and can damage their mouths and teeth. A wide range of injuries can occur. Sometimes the damage to the primary teeth are of little concern and sometime they are severe and teeth can be moved about or knocked out. The more serious injuries can cause damage to the permanent teeth that are still forming in the jaws. The amount and type of damage depends on the age of the child as this reflects the stage of development of the underlying second tooth. The amount of injury will not be seen until the permanent tooth comes into the mouth. A consultation with the dentist as soon as the injury happens is always recommended as evaluation of the damage (usually with x rays) and necessary measures to limit the problems can be implemented.

Children 0-2 years of ageChildren 2-5 years of age
Children 6-10 years of ageChildren 10+ years of age

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Crianças de 0-2 anos de idade

Quando primeiro dente nasce?

O primeiro dente geralmente nasce aos 6 meses de idade. Na maioria das vezes, este é o dente inferior anterior. O período de erupção dos dentes decíduos varia mais do que os dentes permanentes. Os 8 dentes anteriores (4 superiores e 4 inferiores) geralmente nascem aos 9-12 meses de idade.

 

Quando devo começar a limpar os dentes do meu bebê?

Os dentes devem ser limpos assim que o primeiro dente erupcionar. Escovar os dentes do seu bebê com uma escova de dentes apropriada e com pasta de dentes com flúor (1000 ppm) tem provado ser a melhor proteção contra a cárie dentária. Crianças de 0 a 3 anos deve usar um pasta de dente com flúor no tamanho de um grão de arroz. As pastas dentais sem flúor não oferecem proteção contra a cárie dentária

Qual é a melhor maneira de limpar a boca do bebê?

Antes dos dentes erupcionarem, os pais podem usar uma gaze limpa e pequena ou um pano limpo e seco. Os dentes e gengiva são limpos para remover líquidos e detritos de alimentos. Isto pode ser feito antes de se deitar. Assim que o primeiro dente erupciona, uma escova pequena e macia pode ser usada para limpar todas as superfícies dentárias, dando uma especial atenção para os sulcos das superficies oclusais dos molares, para a gengiva e para a língua, usando a quantidade de pasta de dentes com flúor mencionada acima. Quando a criança tiver idade suficiente, os pais devem ensinar e encorajar a cuspir a pasta de dente. Enxaguar completamente não é necessário. Estudos mostram que a melhor proteção contra  cárie é escovar e cuspir. Os pais devem sempre supervisionar a rotina de escovação dos dentes das suas crianças.

 

Devo preocupar-me se o meu bebê engolir a pasta dental?

Se você não estiver usando mais do que um grão de arroz de pasta dental com flúor duas vezes por dia, é seguro se o bebê engolir a pasta. Esta quantidade pequena foi calculada para ser segura, mesmo para um bebê de 6 meses de idade. No entanto, é fácil limpar o excesso de pasta dental com uma gaze limpa ou com uma toalha enquanto você escova os dentes do seu bebê.

 

Quando os dentes decíduous (do bebê) entram em erupção?

Que idade uma criança deve ter a primeira consulta odontológica?

Consultar um dentista quando o primeiro dente erupciona ou no primeiro aniversário da criança é recomendado para ajudar na prevenção de cáries dentárias. Por quê? Porque desta forma o dentista tem a oportunidade de examinar a boca da criança e confirmar a normalidade do desenvolvimento bucal. Os dentes também são avaliados para lver a necessidade da limpeza. Isto proporciona ao dentista a oportunidade de aconselhar sobre prevenção e de realização do melhor plano de tratamento para o seu filho. Além de fornecer aos pais a chance de discutir práticas alimentares, dentição e hábito bucal. Se a criança é considerada com risco de cárie, o dentista pode aplicar medidas preventivas extras, como o verniz de flúor. O melhor plano é evitar que os problemas aconteçam ao invés de corrigi-los.

 

Meu bebê precisa de aplicação de flúor no dentista?

Muitos bebês desenvolvem cárie logo após o nascimento dos seus dentes, como discutiremos na questão 13. Quando existe este risco, uma aplicação de verniz de flúor realizado por um dentista pode tornar os dentes destas crianças mais fortes. Ao levar o seu filho para uma consulta odontológica no primeiro ano de vida, e a cada seis meses após esta primeira visita, ajudará o dentista a avaliar o risco a cárie. Aplicar verniz de flúor é um método fácil, seguro e muito eficaz para proteger os dentes do seu bebê. Quando a criança já tem cárie na sua fase inicial, uma aplicação do verniz de flúor a cada 3 meses pode impedir o crescimento da cavidade, e até mesmo reverter o processo. Converse com seu dentista sobre as necessidades de aplicações de flúor em seu filho. 

 

Quando você acha que meu filho deve desistir da mamadeira?

Para aqueles bebês que não estão sendo amamentados, há um consenso geral de que um bom momento para desmamar o bebê é por volta de um ano de idade. Odontopediatras gostam de ver as crianças deixarem a mamadeira o mais rápido possível. Isto porque eles vêem um número alarmante de crianças com cárie na infância. Este tipo de lesão, que começa nos dentes anteriores, pode ser resultado do uso prolongado da mamadeira com leite adoçado, ou quando esta é dada ao bebê na cama. O mesmo pode acontecer quando o bebê toma líquidos doces diretamente do copo.
O desmame da mamadeira parece seguir dois caminhos. O primeiro é repentino. É uma abordagem. de “abstinência”. O segundo método é uma redução gradual do uso da mamadeira. Geralmente, ocorre durante o dia quando o bebê consegue beber no copo. A última e mais difícil retirada da mamadeira a ser descontinuada é antes de se deitar.
Os pais devem ter em mente que não é a mamadeira ou o copo que causam o problema. É o doce contido nas bebidas. Se seu bebê chupa a mamadeira ou o canudo do copo após a erupção dos dentes, o melhor a ser feito é colocar apenas ÁGUA nestes recipientes. Esta abordagem também ajuda a criar o hábito saudável de beber água ao invés de bebidas açucaradas.

Que medidas devo tomar se eu estiver amamentando o meu bebê?

  1. Amamentação é a forma mais natural e saudável para nutrir tanto a mamãe quanto o bebê. É a forma ideal de nutrição infantil recomendada por pediatras e pela comunidade médica. Uma vez que nasce o primeiro dente do bebê, inicia-se a escovação duas vezes por dia com pasta dental com flúor no tamanho de um grão de arroz, e tenta-se minimizar a alimentação noturna. O leite materno tem açúcares que têm o potencial de iniciar a formação de cáries quando deixados na boca por um longo período de tempo. Bebês que têm dentes e são amamentados durante a noite, pode desenvolver cáries tão severas como aquelas produzidas pela amamentação de mamadeira.

  2.  

Você acha que é O.K. fazer uso da chupeta?

A sucção é um instinto básico dos bebês. Ao longo dos anos tem havido inúmeros debates sobre a utilidade da chupeta. Os benefícios atribuídos ao uso da chupeta parecem compensar qualquer deficiência em crianças menores de 2 anos. Se isso ajuda a confortar seu bebê, então use a chupeta. Certifique-se de usar chupetas com borda grande que fica na parte externa da boca e com o bico em forma oval. Este tipo de chupeta é recomendada para a segurança e melhor desenvolvimento dental.

 

A temperatura da minha criança pode ser causa do rompimento da dentição?

Durante muitos anos, pensava-se que o rompimento da dentição causava febre e doença em geral. A dentição foi culpada por muitas coisas! Pesquisas sobre problemas de dentição mostrou que algumas crianças ficam irritadas, babam mais e às vezes aparecem uma erupção cutânea facial. No entanto, para a maioria das crianças o efeito da dentição é dentes! É uma parte normal do desenvolvimento. Se o seu filho tem uma temperatura alta que o preocupa, é improvável que seja causado por dentição e você deve consultar um médico.

 

O que você recomenda para o rompimento da dentição?

Muitos remédios têm sido sugeridos ao longo dos anos, porém não existe nenhum medicamento que possa ajudar. Anéis dentais demonstraram ser útéis para alguns bebês. A pressão ao morder parece aliviar algum desconforto, especialmente se o anel estiver gelado. Outra fácil alternativa é usar uma toalha limpa e molhada colocada no freezer que pode oferecer uma superfície macia e fria para o bebê ao mastigar. Os comprimidos para aliviar a dor e os medicamentos anestésicos locais disponíveis para este fim devem ser utilizados como último recurso.

 

Por que algumas crianças têm cáries antes dos dois anos de idade?

Aproximadamente 1 em 10 crianças experimentam cáries dentárias antes dos dois anos de idade. Em certas comunidades esse número pode ser muito maior. A causa mais comum é quando um bebê é colocado no berço à noite com uma mamadeira com leite ou com líquido adocicado. O conteúdo da mamadeira une-se aos dentes durante toda a noite. Inicia-se o processo de formação da cárie dentária! O mesmo efeito pode ocorrer com uma chupeta adocicada. Em algumas circunstâncias, os bebês que são amamentados durante a noite por um longo período de tempo também estão em risco. A cárie dentária desenvolvidas por estas crianças tem um padrão típico. É geralmente evidente perto da linha da gengiva nos dentes anteriores superiors. Devido à idade dessas crianças, o tratamento torna-se um grande problema, e às vezes se faz necessário o uso de anestesia geral. Os pais precisam estar alertas e manter os dentes dos seus filhos saudáveis, escovando-os duas vezes por dia, com pasta dental com flúor do tamanho de um grão de arroz, assim que o primeiro dente erupcionar. Ocasionalmente, doenças ou algum outro distúrbio podem afetar os dentes em crescimento, levando a formação de um esmalte enfraquecido. Estes dentes podem cariar mais facilmente. Um exame dental no primeiro ano de vida da criança ajuda a identificar esses problemas, e permite que o seu dentista implemente medidas preventivas adicionais, como a aplicação profissional de verniz de flúor.

O que pode ser feito com o ranger dos dentes à noite?

Algumas crianças rangem os dentes à noite. Este hábito chama-se bruxismo e não é incomum nos primeiros anos, especialmente nos períodos de crescimento de novos dentes. Sabemos que isso realmente preocupa os pais, mas raramente requer tratamento. Este hábito, geralmente é pequeno e só em raras ocasiões apresentará desgastes dentários significantes. Visitas regulares ao dentista permitirá avaliar o desgaste e estabelecer medidas preventivas para limitar os danos aos dentes.

Os dentes decíduos são importantes?

Durante anos, a importância dos dentes decíduos foi subestimada. Uma vez reconhecida sua importância, os dentes permanentes melhoraram. As razões óbvias da importâncias dos dentes decíduos são: – mastigação, fala, e aparência. Além disto, os dentes decíduos conservam o espaço na mandíbula e maxilla para os dentes permanentes. Se os dentes decíduos são removidos antes do seu tempo natural, o espaço para os dentes permanentes pode ser perdido. Crianças que tiveram cáries em seus dentes decíduos têm muitas chances de ter cáries em seus dentes permanentes. Estabelecer bons hábitos que impeçam a cárie dentária nos dentes decíduos abre o caminho para uma vida com uma saúde bucal saudável.

 

Lesões em dentes decíduos afetam os dentes permanentes?

Muitas crianças, infelizmente sofrem acidentes, que podem danificar a boca e os dentes. Uma ampla gama de lesões pode ocorrer. Os danos aos dentes decíduos podem ser de pouca preocupação, ou graves, onde os dentes podem ficar móvel ou serem removidos da cavidade bucal. As lesões mais graves podem causar danos aos dentes permanentes que ainda estão sendo formados. A quantidade e o tipo de dano depende da idade da criança, pois isso reflete o estágio de desenvolvimento do dente subjacente. A quantidade de lesão não será vista até que o dente permanente erupcione na boca. Uma consulta com o dentista logo depois da injúria é sempre recomendada, para avaliação dos danos (geralmente com raios x) e implementação de medidas necessárias para limitar os problemas.

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Niños de 0 a 2 años de edad

¿A qué edad erupciona el primer diente?

El primer diente, por lo general, erupciona a los 6 meses de edad. Muy a menudo es un diente frontal inferior. La sincronización de la erupción de los dientes primarios es más variable que para los permanentes. Los 8 dientes frontales (4 en la parte superior y 4 en la parte inferior) por lo general erupcionan entre los 9 y los 12 meses de edad.

¿Cuándo debería empezar a limpiarle los dientes a mi bebé?

La respuesta simple es que los dientes deben limpiarse apenas erupcione el primero. Cepillarle los dientes a su bebé con un cepillo adecuado y con pasta con fluoruro de fuerza total (1000 ppm) ha demostrado ser la mejor protección contra la caries dental. Los niños de 0 a 3 años de edad deben utilizar un cantidad de pasta de dientes con fluoruro del tamaño de un grano de arroz. Las pastas de dientes infantiles NO ofrecen protección contra la caries dental.

¿Cuál es la mejor manera de limpiar la boca de mi bebé?

Antes de que los dientes erupcionen, los padres pueden usar una pequeña gasa limpia o un trapo limpio y seco. Los dientes y las encías se limpian para eliminar los residuos de alimentos y bebidas. Esto puede hacerse antes de su hora de dormir. Tan pronto como al niño le erupcione el primer diente, se puede utilizar un pequeño cepillo de dientes suave para limpiar todas las superficies dentales, prestando especial atención a las ranuras en las superficies de los molares, así como las encías y la lengua, utilizando la cantidad de pasta de dientes con flúor previamente mencionada. Cuando el niño tenga edad suficiente, los padres deben enseñarle y motivarlo a escupir la pasta de dientes. No es necesario enjuagar por completo. Los estudios demuestran que la mejor protección contra las caries es cepillar y después escupir. Los padres deben supervisar siempre la rutina de cepillado de sus hijos cuando éstos son aún pequeños.

¿Debería preocuparme de que mi bebé se trague la pasta de dientes?

Si se está usando una cantidad de pasta de dientes con fluoruro menor al tamaño de un grano de arroz dos veces al día, entonces no debe preocuparse si el bebé se llegara a tragar la pasta . La pequeña cantidad se ha calculado para ser segura, incluso para un niño de 6 meses de edad. Sin embargo, es fácil limpiar el exceso de pasta dental con una gasa limpia o una toalla mientras cepillas los dientes de tu bebé.

¿Cuándo brotan los dientes de leche (bebés)?

¿A qué edad debe tener un niño su primera revisión dental?

Visitar a un dentista cuando el primer diente erupciona o pasando el primer cumpleaños es recomendable para ayudar a reducir el número de niños que sufren de caries.
¿Por qué? Al ver al niño con anticipación le da al dentista la oportunidad de examinar la boca y confirmar que el desarrollo oral sea normal. Principalmente, los dientes se pueden examinar para la limpieza. También le proporciona al dentista la oportunidad de brindar consejos sobre prevención y hacer el mejor plan de cuidado para su hijo. Además, les da a los padres la oportunidad de discutir las prácticas alimenticias, la dentición y los hábitos bucales. Si el niño llegara a estar en riesgo de tener caries, el dentista puede aplicar medidas preventivas adicionales, por ejemplo barniz de fluoruro. El mejor plan es evitar que sucedan los problemas en lugar de intentar arreglarlos una vez que ocurren.

¿Necesita mi bebé una aplicación de flúor en el dentista?

Muchos bebés sufren de lesiones de caries poco después de que les erupcionan los primeros dientes, como se discute en la pregunta 13. Cuando los niños están en riesgo de tener caries, una aplicación profesional de barniz de fluoruro puede hacer que sus dientes se fortalezcan. A partir de que sus hijos sean llevados a su primera visita dental al cumplir un año, y cada seis meses después de eso, su dentista puede evaluar si su hijo está en riesgo de tener caries, o si hay signos tempranos de tenerlas. En ese caso la aplicación de barniz de fluoruro es un método fácil, seguro y muy eficaz para proteger los dientes de su bebé. Cuando los niños ya comienzan a tener caries, la aplicación de barniz de fluoruro cada 3 meses puede evitar que éstas se vuelvan más grandes e incluso puede revertir el proceso. Hable con su dentista sobre las necesidades individuales de su hijo para las aplicaciones del flúor.

  1.  

¿Cuándo se recomienda que mi hijo deje de tomar biberón?

Para aquellos bebés que no están siendo amamantados, hay un acuerdo general de que alrededor de un año de edad es un buen momento para destetar al bebé del biberón. A los dentistas pediátricos les gusta ver a los niños abandonar el biberón tan pronto como sea posible. Eso es porque ven un número alarmante de niños pequeños con caries durante su infancia temprana. Este tipo de deterioro, que comienza en los dientes delanteros, puede resultar del uso prolongado de leche o cualquier líquido artificialmente endulzado, o cuando le es dado el biberón al bebé estando en la cama. Lo mismo puede suceder cuando el bebé toma líquidos artificialmente endulzados de una taza de entrenamiento.

El destete del biberón funciona efectivamente de dos formas. La primera es retirar el biberón de repente. Es un enfoque llamado “cold turkey” (literalmente “pavo frío” en español). El segundo método es una reducción gradual en el uso del biberón. La reducción por lo general comienza durante el día en que el bebé es capaz de beber de una taza. La toma de biberón más difícil de retirar es aquella que realiza el bebé antes de acostarse.

Los padres deben tener en cuenta que no es ni el biberón ni la taza de entrenamiento la que causan el problema. Son las bebidas artificialmente endulzadas las que pueden causar caries. Si su bebé tiene que succionar de un biberón o de un taza de entrenamiento después de que los dientes han salido, lo más recomendable es llenarlas solamente de AGUA. Este enfoque también ayuda a crear el hábito saludable de beber agua en lugar de bebidas artificialmente endulzadas.

¿Qué medidas debo tomar si estoy amamantando a mi bebé?

Amamantar es la forma más natural y saludable de nutrir tanto a la mamá como al bebé. Es ampliamente recomendada como la forma ideal de nutrición infantil por los pediatras y la comunidad médica. Antes de que al bebé le erupcionen los dientes, seguir el horario recomendado por su pediatra es la mejor opción. Una vez que al bebé le crezca su primer diente, empiece a cepillárselo dos veces al día utilizando una cantidad de pasta de dientes con fluoruro del tamaño de un grano de arroz, e intente minimizar las comidas nocturnas. La leche materna contiene azúcares que poseen el potencial de formar caries si permanecen en la boca del bebé durante largos periodos de tiempo. Los bebés que ya tienen dientes y son amamantados antes de dormir por las noches, pueden desarrollar caries tan severas como las producidas por un biberón de amamantar.

 

¿No hay problema si mi bebé usa chupón?

La succión es un instinto básico de los bebés. A lo largo de los años ha habido numerosos debates sobre la utilidad de los chupones. Los beneficios que se les atribuyen parecen superar cualquier deficiencia potencial para los niños menores de 2 años. Si éste ayuda a consolar a su bebé, no hay problema con que lo use. Asegúrese de usar chupones con un reborde grande que se sienta en el exterior de la boca y un pezón de forma oval. Este tipo de chupón es recomendado por seguridad y para un mejor desarrollo dental.

 

¿El aumento de la temperatura de mi hijo puede ser consecuencia de la dentición?

Durante años, muchos han pensado que la dentición causaba fiebre y enfermedades en general. ¡La dentición ha sido culpada por muchas cosas! La investigación de los problemas de la dentición ha demostrado que algunos niños se vuelven irritables, les aumenta el babeo y, a veces, les brotan erupciones faciales. Sin embargo, para la mayoría de los niños, ¡el único efecto de la dentición son los mismos dientes! Es una parte normal del desarrollo. Si su hijo tiene la temperatura más alta de lo normal, es poco probable que sea causada por la dentición y se recomienda que consulte a su médico.

 

¿Qué me recomienda para disminuir la incomodidad durante la erupción de los dientes?

Muchos remedios han sido sugeridos a lo largo de los años. Hay antídotos no médicos que pueden ayudar. Los anillos de dentición han resultado ser útiles para algunos bebés. La presión de morder parece aliviar algunas molestias, especialmente si el anillo de dentición se enfría. Otra alternativa fácil es usar una toalla limpia y húmeda colocada en el congelador que pueda ofrecer una superficie fría y suave para que el bebé mastique. Las pastillas de alivio del dolor y los medicamentos anestésicos locales especiales disponibles para este propósito deben ser dejados como último recurso.

 

¿Por qué a algunos niños les salen caries antes de los dos años de edad?

Aproximadamente 1 de cada 10 niños experimentan caries antes de que tengan dos años. En ciertas comunidades ese número puede ser mucho mayor. La causa más común es cuando a un bebé se le coloca en la cuna por las noches con un biberón de leche o de algún líquido artificialmente endulzado. El contenido del biberón se queda en los dientes toda la noche. ¡Comienzan las caries! El mismo efecto puede ocurrir con un chupón endulzado. En raras circunstancias, los bebés que son amamantados mucho tiempo durante la noche también están en riesgo. El deterioro experimentado por estos infantes tiene un patrón típico. Por lo general, éste es evidente cerca de la línea de la encía de los dientes delanteros superiores. Debido a la edad de estos niños, el tratamiento se convierte en un problema importante que a veces incluso requiere anestesia general. Los padres necesitan estar al pendiente y mantener los dientes de sus hijos sanos, cepillando dos veces al día con una cantidad de pasta de dientes con flúor del tamaño de un grano de arroz tan pronto como el primer diente salga. Ocasionalmente, cuando las enfermedades u otras alteraciones afectan el crecimiento de los dientes, la calidad del esmalte es deficiente. Estos dientes pueden deteriorarse pronto y con mayor facilidad. Un examen dental para cuando el niño cumpla un año de edad ayuda a identificar estos problemas, y permite que su dentista pueda implementar medidas preventivas adicionales, como la aplicación profesional de barniz de fluoruro.

 

¿Qué puedo hacer cuando mi hijo rechina los dientes por la noche?

Algunos niños rechinan los dientes por la noche. Se trata de un hábito llamado bruxismo. No es inusual en los primeros años, especialmente en los períodos en los que a los niños les están creciendo nuevos dientes. Sabemos que esto en verdad preocupa a los padres, pero rara vez requiere tratamiento. El hábito de rechinido suele ser menor y sólo en raras ocasiones causará que los dientes se desgasten entre ellos significativamente. Las visitas periódicas al dentista permitirán evaluar el desgaste y establecer medidas preventivas para limitar el daño a los dientes.

 

¿Los dientes primarios son importantes?

Durante años, la importancia de los dientes primarios fue subestimada. Una vez que se reconoció su importancia, los dientes permanentes mejoraron. Hay razones obvias por las que los dientes primarios son importantes – masticar, hablar y una buena apariencia. Los dientes primarios hacen más. Conservan el espacio en los maxilares para los dientes permanentes. Si los dientes primarios son extraídos antes de caerse naturalmente, el espacio para los dientes secundarios puede perderse. Los niños que han tenido caries en los dientes primarios tienen muchas más posibilidades de tener caries en sus dientes permanentes. Establecer buenos hábitos que previenen las caries en los dientes primarios abre el camino a toda la vida con una boca sana.

 

¿Las lesiones de los dientes primarios afectan a los dientes permanentes?

  1. Muchos niños tienen accidentes desafortunados que pueden dañar sus bocas y dientes. Una amplia gama de lesiones pueden ocurrir. Algunas veces el daño a los dientes primarios puede ser de poca preocupación y otras veces puede ser muy grave y los dientes tendrían que ser removidos o extraídos. Las lesiones más graves pueden causar daño a los dientes permanentes que todavía se están formando en los maxilares. La cantidad y tipo de daño depende de la edad del niño, ya que esto refleja la etapa de desarrollo del diente sucesor. La lesión del diente permanente generalmente no puede verse hasta que el mismo erupcione en la boca. Siempre se recomienda una consulta con el dentista tan pronto como ocurra la trauma para que éste evalúe el daño (generalmente con rayos x) y se puedan implementar las medidas necesarias para limitar los problemas.
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Frequently Asked Questions

How can I prevent my teenager from getting cavities?

As adolescents enter higher grades in school, they may want to expand their independence with daily habits and food choices. Many times they can even purchase their foods independently. This is a challenging time to enforce good habits to insure good overall health. To insure your teenage child continues to have healthy teeth and body:

Does my teenager still need fluoride applications at the dentist?

As children grow into their teens and their habits of eating and brushing change, so does their risk for getting cavities. During regular dental checkups, your dentist will be able to identify if your teenager is at risk, and continue to recommend fluoride varnish applications if needed. As a general rule, if your teenager is not brushing consistently twice a day, or not brushing well enough, snacking several times during the day, eating or drinking sweet snacks in between meals, has had cavities in the last two years, is wearing braces or retainers, or is taking medicine that makes the mouth dry, he/she could benefit from having fluoride varnish applications even well into adolescence.

Why are my child’s gums red around the lower teeth?

The gums around the lower teeth may become red and sometimes bleed easily when brushing. The main reason for this relates to improper cleaning of the teeth and gum-line. If the teeth are not straight, they may be more difficult to clean. The gums and teeth need to be brushed regularly at least twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. Dental flossing can help clear up the situation as the floss gets between the teeth and removes plaque from areas that the brush cannot reach. Parents and children can tell when the gums are getting healthier because the bleeding decreases and the gums become pink and hard. One special situation that should be mentioned is called pubertal gingivitis. This condition can persist even though the mouth appears well cleaned. It is due to the hormonal changes that occur in the body at puberty. It is usually a passing phase, and with persistent proper hygiene, the gums will eventually return to the healthy, pink color.
 

Is it O.K. that my teenager uses mouthwash regularly?

Many teens start to use mouthwash regularly because they become more interested in their personal hygiene. The use of mouthwash should not be a substitute for regular, good tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste that includes brushing the tongue as it can contribute to a stale mouth odor. When using a mouthwash, it is good to use one with fluoride or proven anti plaque benefits.

When will my child get braces?

Children vary in their development and so they will vary when they get braces. As well, the type of treatment being undertaken will determine when orthodontic treatment begins, and it depends on the child’s individual needs and expected cooperation with the treatment. 
Orthodontics may be undertaken early, when there are both primary and permanent teeth in the mouth. Sometimes it is all that is required or it could be the first part of a lengthy treatment. Commonly orthodontics begins later (after 10 years of age) when the permanent teeth have come in and they can be guided into the ideal position. 
 

Will my child need permanent teeth removed if they get braces?

The decision to remove teeth will depend on the orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. There are different approaches to treatment and the plan depends on the child’s bite, the amount of room required to accommodate all teeth and how much they are expected to grow. The decision on the need to remove teeth will be different for every child, and your best bet is to coordinate the opinions of your dentist and your orthodontist.
 

What is a panoramic (OPG) x-ray?

A panoramic x-ray is an x-ray film taken outside of the mouth by a machine that rotates around the head. This type of x-ray gives the dentist a whole view of the teeth and jaws. When dealing with children, its main use is to examine the developing dentition. The dentist can see the presence or absence of teeth without having to take several x-rays inside the mouth. It is a good way for screening out all types of problems but is not suitable for tooth decay diagnosis.

What is the best way to clean the mouth when wearing braces?

We realize that cleaning the mouth while wearing braces is not an easy thing to do. It takes more time and requires more effort. The person who puts the braces on should spend time instructing you what to do. 
Three things can be suggested for home care.

  1. Brushing may require a standard brush for regular cleaning and a special brush (small end-tufted brush) to clean around the hardware.
  2. Special dental floss threaders which enable cleaning between teeth that cannot be done with wires in place.
  3. Fluoride mouth rinse or fluoride gel should be used daily because children wearing braces are more prone to tooth decay.

Be very alert to having good hygiene and diet while wearing braces! Nothing is more disappointing to children, parents and clinicians than having to cope with gum problems and tooth decay when the braces are removed.
 

When do you get wisdom teeth?

Wisdom teeth, or third molars, may come into the mouth as early as 16 years of age but usually they come in several years later. 
This question is prompted by hearing stories about wisdom tooth problems. These problems are often due to inadequate space in the back of the mouth for these teeth to grow in. As a result, they only partially come into the mouth, making proper cleaning very difficult. The gums around them tend to become infected causing pain and swelling, requiring the wisdom tooth removal. When wisdom teeth are removed under these conditions the extraction and recovery can be difficult. Many teenagers are able to grow their wisdom teeth without problems, and this is the ideal situation. The conditions that lead to problems with the wisdom teeth can be detected by your dentist during regular dental visits. Since the surgery is easier when the roots of the teeth are not fully formed, consult with your dentist what are the specific recommendations for your child’s wisdom teeth.
 

Are mouth beads (rings) harmful in any way?

The current trend for young people to have facial jewelry can sometimes cause dental damage. Tongue studs, for example, can contribute to breakage of back teeth. Lip rings can get caught in clothing or elsewhere and tearing of the lip can occur. The jewelry needs to be well-cleaned as it often is in areas where infection can easily begin. Whenever these items or tattoos are put into the mouth, they should be done under the cleanest possible conditions.

Children 0-2 years of ageChildren 2-5 years of age
Children 6-10 years of ageChildren 10+ years of age

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Niños de 10 años de edad en adelante

¿Cómo puedo prevenir que mi hijo adolescente tenga caries?

A medida que los adolescentes entran a niveles superiores en la escuela, es posible que deseen ampliar su independencia con los hábitos diarios y las opciones alimenticias. Muchas veces incluso pueden comprar su comida de forma independiente. Este es un momento difícil para hacer que se cumplan los buenos hábitos para asegurar una buena salud en general. Para que su hijo adolescente continúe teniendo su cuerpo y dientes sanos:

¿Mi hijo adolescente todavía necesita aplicaciones de fluoruro en el dentista?

A medida que los niños van creciendo en su años de adolescencia y sus hábitos alimenticios y de cepillado han cambiado, también lo hace su riesgo de obtener caries. Durante los exámenes dentales regulares, su dentista será capaz de identificar si su adolescente está en riesgo y si debe seguir recomendándole las aplicaciones de barniz de fluoruro cuando fuera el caso. Como regla general, si su adolescente no se está cepillando consistentemente dos veces al día, o no se cepilla lo suficientemente bien, come bocadillos varias veces durante el día, consume productos dulces entre comidas, ha tenido caries en los últimos dos años, está usando brackets o retenedores, o está tomando medicamentos que hacen que su boca se seque, él o ella podría beneficiarse de tener aplicaciones de barniz de fluoruro incluso en la adolescencia.

¿Por qué las encías de mi hijo están rojas alrededor de los dientes inferiores?

Las encías alrededor de los dientes inferiores pueden tornarse rojas y a veces sangrar fácilmente al cepillarse. La razón principal de esto es por la limpieza inadecuada de los dientes y la línea de las encías. Si los dientes no son rectos, pueden ser más difíciles de limpiar. Las encías y los dientes deben ser cepillados regularmente al menos dos veces al día con pasta de dientes con fluoruro. El hilo dental puede ayudar a aclarar la situación, ya que éste logra llegar a aquel espacio entre los dientes que el cepillo no alcanza y elimina la placa. Padres e hijos podrán saber cuando las encías se vuelvan más saludables porque el sangrado disminuirá y éstas se tornarán rosadas y duras. Una situación especial que debe mencionarse es la llamada gingivitis puberal. Esta condición puede persistir incluso aunque la boca parezca estar bien limpia. Se debe a los cambios hormonales que se producen en el cuerpo durante la pubertad. Por lo general es una fase pasajera, y con la higiene adecuada y persistente, las encías finalmente volverán a su saludable color rosa.
 

¿No hay problema con que mi hijo/a adolescente use enjuague bucal regularmente?

Muchos adolescentes comienzan a usar el enjuague bucal regularmente porque se interesan más en su higiene personal. El uso de enjuague bucal no debe ser un sustituto para el cepillado de dientes bueno y regular, con pasta de dientes con fluoruro que incluye el cepillado de la lengua, ya que puede contribuir a que su aliento tenga un olor rancio. Cuando use un enjuague bucal, es bueno usar uno con fluoruro o con beneficios probados contra la placa.
 

¿Cuándo deberá usar brackets mi hijo?

Los niños varían en su desarrollo, y por lo tanto también lo hacen cuando es su momento de usar brackets. Además, el tipo de tratamiento que se está llevando a cabo determinará cuándo deba comenzar con la ortodoncia y depende de las necesidades individuales del niño y de la cooperación esperada con el mismo.
La ortodoncia se puede realizar tempranamente, cuando hay dientes primarios y permanentes en la boca. A veces es todo lo que se requiere o podría ser la primera parte de un tratamiento prolongado. Comúnmente la ortodoncia comienza más tarde (después de los 10 años de edad) cuando los dientes permanentes han entrado y pueden ser guiados a la posición ideal. 

¿Mi hijo/a necesitará que le extraigan dientes permanentes si le ponen brackets?

La decisión de extraer los dientes dependerá del plan de tratamiento y diagnóstico ortodóncico. Hay diferentes enfoques para el tratamiento y el plan depende de la mordedura del niño, la cantidad de espacio necesario para acomodar todos los dientes y cuánto se espera que crezcan. La decisión sobre la necesidad de extraer los dientes será diferente para cada niño, y su mejor opción es coordinar las opiniones de su dentista y su ortodoncista.

¿Qué es una radiografía panorámica (OPG)?

Una radiografía panorámica es una película de rayos X tomada fuera de la boca por una máquina que gira alrededor de la cabeza. Este tipo de radiografía da al dentista una visión completa de los dientes y los maxilares. Cuando se trata con niños, su uso principal es examinar la dentición en desarrollo. El dentista puede ver la presencia o ausencia de dientes sin tener que tomar varias radiografías dentro de la boca. Es una buena manera de detectar todo tipo de problemas, pero no es adecuado para el diagnóstico de caries.

¿Cuál es la mejor manera de limpiar la boca cuando usas brackets?

Nos damos cuenta de que la limpieza bucal mientras usamos brackets no es una cosa fácil de hacer. Se necesita más tiempo y requiere más esfuerzo. El ortodoncista que coloca los brackets debe pasar tiempo instruyendo a sus hijo/as sobre cómo se debe hacer. Se pueden sugerir tres cosas para su cuidado en casa:

  1. El cepillado puede requerir un cepillo estándar para la limpieza regular y un cepillo especial (cepillo penacho activo pequeño) para limpiar alrededor del bracket y alambre.
  2. Enherbadores de hilo dental especial que permitan la limpieza entre los dientes por debajo del arco de alambre.
  3. El enjuague bucal con fluoruro o gel de fluoruro se debe usar diariamente porque los niños que usan brackets son más propensos a desarrollar caries.

¡Esté muy alerta a tener una buena higiene y dieta mientras usa brackets! Nada es más decepcionante para los niños, los padres y los médicos que tener que afrontar problemas en las encías y las caries cuando los brackets son removidos.

¿Cuándo salen las muelas del juicio?

Las muelas del juicio, o terceros molares, pueden aparecer en la boca apenas su hijo/a cumpla los 16 años de edad, pero por lo general salen varios años más tarde.
Esta pregunta ha surgido al escuchar algunos problemas con las muelas del juicio; estos son, a menudo, debido a que el espacio en la parte posterior de la boca es inadecuado para que estos dientes crezcan. Como resultado, entran solamente de manera parcial en la boca, haciendo que la limpieza adecuada se vuelva muy difícil. Las encías alrededor de las muelas del juicio tienden a infectarse, causando dolor e hinchazón, que requieren la eliminación de las mismas; cuando éstas se quitan, en estas condiciones la extracción y recuperación pueden ser difíciles. A muchos adolescentes les salen las muelas del juicio sin problema alguno, y esta es la situación ideal. Las condiciones que llevan a tener problemas con las muelas del juicio pueden ser detectadas por su dentista durante las visitas periódicas. Dado que la cirugía es mucho más fácil cuando las raíces de los dientes no están completamente formadas aun, consulte con su dentista cuáles son las recomendaciones específicas para las muelas del juicio de su hijo.

¿Son perjudiciales las perforaciones (en la boca) en algún sentido?

  1. La tendencia actual entre los jóvenes de usar joyería facial a veces puede causar daño dental. Las perforaciones en la lengua, por ejemplo, pueden contribuir a la fractura de los dientes posteriores. Las perforaciones en el labio pueden quedar atoradas en la ropa o en cualquier otro lugar, pudiendo ocasionar un desgarre labial. Cualquier artículo de joyería necesita estar muy limpio, ya que a menudo la boca es una de las partes de nuestro cuerpo que se infectan con mayor facilidad. Cada vez que estos artículos o tatuajes sean introducidos en la boca de sus adolescentes, se debe hacer de la forma más limpia posible.
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Crianças de 10 anos ou +

Como posso evitar que o meu filho tenha cáries?

À medida que os adolescentes iniciam o primeiro grau, eles começam a se tornar mais independentes, no que diz respeito aos seus hábitos diários e suas escolhas alimentares. Muitas vezes eles podem até comprar seus alimentos de forma independente. Este é um momento desafiador para impor bons hábitos no intuito de garantir uma boa saúde em geral. Para garantir que o seu filho adolescente continue a ter dentes e corpo saudáveis, deve-se:

Meu filho adolescente ainda precisa de aplicações de flúor no dentista?

Os hábitos alimentares e de escovação mudam à medida que as crianças crescem. O mesmo acontece com o risco de cáries. Durante exames odontológicos regulares, seu dentista será capaz de identificar se o seu adolescente está em risco, e continuará a recomendar aplicações de verniz de flúor, se necessário. Como regra geral, se o seu adolescente não está escovando os dentes consistentemente duas vezes por dia, ou não escova bem o suficiente, merenda várias vezes durante o dia, come ou bebe doces entre as refeições, já teve cáries nos últimos dois anos, está usando aparelhos ou retentores, está tomando remédios que torna a boca seca, ele/ela poderá se beneficiar com aplicações de verniz de flúor até mesmo na adolescência.

Por que a gengiva do meu filho está vermelha ao redor dos dentes inferiores?

A gengiva ao redor dos dentes inferiores podem ficar vermelhas e, às vezes, sangram facilmente ao escovar. A principal razão para isso diz respeito à limpeza incorreta dos dentes e da linha gengival. Se os dentes não são retos, eles podem ser mais difíceis de limpar. A gengiva e os dentes precisam ser escovados regularmente por pelo menos duas vezes por dia com creme dental com flúor. Fio dental ajuda na limpeza, uma vez que o fio dental é utilizado entre os dentes e remove a placa das áreas que a escova não alcança. Os pais e as crianças podem dizer quando a gengiva está ficando mais saudáveis uma vez que o sangramento diminui e a gengiva ficam cor de rosa. Uma situação especial que deve ser mencionada é a chamada gengivite puberal. Esta condição pode persistir mesmo que a boca esteja limpa. Isto acontece devido às mudanças hormonais que ocorrem no corpo durante a puberdade. É geralmente uma fase passageira, e com a higiene adequada, a gengiva retornará eventualmente à cor rosa saudável.

É ok que meu filho adolescente bocheche regularmente?

Muitos adolescentes começam a bochechar de forma regular, porque eles se tornam mais interessados com a sua higiene pessoal. Uma escovação regular com pasta dental fluoretada que inclui a escovação da língua não deve ser substituída pelo uso de enxaguatórios bucais.  Ao usar enxaguatório bucal, é bom usar com flúor.

Quando meu filho colocará aparelho?

As crianças variam em seu desenvolvimento, o que leva a variação da época em que colocarão aparelhos nos dentes. Além disto, o tipo de tratamento que será realizado determinará quando o tratamento ortodôntico irá começar, e isso depende das necessidades individuais da criança e da cooperação com o tratamento.
A ortodontia pode ser realizada precocemente, quando há dentes decíduos e permanentes na boca. Às vezes, este é o único requisito. Ou, quando há necessidade de iniciar a primeira parte de um tratamento ortodôntico prolongado. Comumente, a ortodontia começa após os 10 anos de idade, quando os dentes permanentes já erupcionaram, podendo ser guiados para uma posição ideal. 

Será que o meu filho precisará de extrair dentes permanentes se ele colocar aparelho?

A decisão de extrair os dentes dependerá do diagnóstico ortodôntico e do plano de tratamento. Existem diferentes abordagens para o tratamento e o plano depende da mordida da criança e da quantidade de espaço necessário para acomodar todos os dentes. A decisão sobre a necessidade de remover os dentes será diferente para cada criança, e a sua melhor aposta é coordenar as opiniões de seu dentista com o seu ortodontista.

O que é uma radiografia panorâmica?

Uma radiografia panorâmica é um filme de raio-x tomado fora da boca por uma máquina que gira ao redor da cabeça. Este tipo de raio-x dá ao dentista uma visão completa dos dentes e das mandíbulas. Quando se trata de crianças, seu principal uso é examinar a dentição em desenvolvimento. O dentista pode ver a presença ou ausência dos dentes sem ter que tirar vários raios-x intra-bucais. É uma boa maneira de rastrear os problemas, mas não é adequado para diagnóstico de cárie dentária.

Qual é a melhor forma de limpar a boca quando se usa aparelhos?

Limpar a boca durante o uso de aparelhos não é algo fácil de se fazer. Requer mais tempo e mais esforço. O dentista deve instruir o paciente com o cuidado bucal em casa da seguinte forma:

  1. A escovação exige uma escova dental padrão para limpeza regular e uma escova dental especial (escova com pequenos e finos tufos) para limpar ao redor do aparelho.
  2. Especial fio dental que permitam a limpeza entre os dentes que não pode ser limpos devido a presença do fio ortodôntico.
  3. Bochecho ou gel com flúor deve ser usado diariamente porque as crianças com aparelhos são mais propensas ao risco de cárie dentária.

Esteja muito alerta com a higiene bucal e dieta enquanto estiver usando aparelho! Nada é mais decepcionante para as crianças, para os pais e para os dentistas do que ter que lidar com problemas gingivais e cáries dentárias ao remover o aparelho.  

Quando os sisos nascem?

Os sisos ou os terceiros molares podem nascer aos16 anos de idade, mas geralmente a sua erupção ocorre vários anos mais tarde. Esta pergunta ocorre devido as histórias escudatas sobre os problemas que o siso pode gerar. Estes problemas estão muitas vezes relacionados ao espaço inadequado na parte posterior da cavidade bucal para permiitr o crescimento destes dentes. Como resultado, os sisos só erupcionam parcialmente, tornando a limpeza adequada muito difícil. A gengiva ao redor dos dentes tendem a se tornar infectada causando dor e inchaço, exigindo a remoção deste dente. Quando os sisos são removidos nestas condições a extração e a recuperação podem ser difíceis. Muitos adolescentes podem ter seus sisos sem problemas, e esta é a situação ideal. As condições que levam a problemas com estes dentes podem ser detectadas pelo seu dentista durante visitas odontológicas regulares. Uma vez que a cirurgia é mais fácil de ser realizada quando as raízes dos dentes não estão totalmente formadas, uma consulta ao seu dentista para saber as recomendações específicas para os dentes do seu filho é importante.

O uso de jóias faciais prejudicam de alguma forma?

A tendência atual dos jovens em ter jóias faciais pode causar danos dentários. Piercings na língua, por exemplo, podem contribuir para a fratura dos dentes posteriores. Anéis no lábio podem ficar preso em roupa, podendo levar o dilaceramento do lábio A jóia precisa ser bem limpa já que muitas vezes esta se encontra em áreas de fácil infecção. Sempre que esses itens ou tatuagens são colocados na boca devem ser feitos sob as condições mais limpas possíveis.

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Frequently Asked Questions

By two years of age, are all the baby teeth present?

There is a lot of variation among children. The likely answer is no! Primary teeth begin to arrive around 6 months of age. By age two, 16 teeth usually are present and the last of the molars begin to appear, but they do not finish erupting until around 30 months. The upper molars are usually the last to come in. Click to see chart.

What type of toothbrush do you recommend?

There are many types of toothbrushes on the market. Some manufacturers specialize in the development of children’s toothbrushes. 
Rather offering a brand name, we would like you to think about what you want in a toothbrush for a child 2 -5 years old. Look for a brush with a short and bulky handle as this is easier for the young child to manage. Bristles should be soft to avoid injury.

How often do you recommend cleaning teeth?

 

One of the most important things about a tooth cleaning schedule is developing good habits. Brushing should be done at least twice daily – morning and at bedtime. Of course, if it is done more often it is beneficial, especially after meals or sweet snacks. The highest prevention against cavities, happens when brushing with fluoride toothpaste is surpervised by parents.

How much toothpaste is it safe to use on my toddler?

0-3 years of age = size of a grain of rice​

3-6 years of age = size of a pea

 

 

 

As mentioned in the section before, children 0-3 should use an amount of fluoride toothpaste equal to the size of a grain of rice twice a day. Children 3 to 6 should use an amount equal to the size of a pea. This amount is safe even if swallowed, however, it is a good idea to teach your toddler to spit the excess toothpaste. Rinsing is NOT necessary, as the highest protection against cavities results from brushing and spitting only.

What can be done if my child doesn’t like toothpaste?

Hand the child a toothbrush. Isolated on white background

Brushing is important as it allows to remove the food debris from around the teeth and gums. However, toothpaste with 1000 ppm of fluoride makes the tooth more resistant to decay by making the outer tooth layer (enamel) stronger. Without fluoride toothpaste this benefit is lost. Toothpastes also help to have a pleasant breath. Different brands have different flavoring.

You may try several toothpastes so as to find the one your child likes. In this way you will help him/her to get used to the routine of brushing. Just make sure that you always use the right amount of toothpaste: size of a grain of rice for 0-3 and size of a pea for children 3 to 6.

Why do my child’s upper and lower teeth not come together?

This is typical of what dentists call an “open bite”. This situation can be seen in younger children (2-5 years) and in some older ones too. There are several reasons why this may occur. One of the most common causes of an open bite is habit. Sucking fingers or thumbs, placing the tongue between the teeth and holding objects between the teeth (like a pacifier) all are habits that can cause this problem. It can also be a family trait. 
There are choices for dealing with open bites due to habits. The condition can be left without treatment. There are several ways that a habit can be eliminated. When this is done, very often the teeth move back into a better position without further treatment. Your dental caregiver should be consulted if your child has any of these habits.

What do you suggest to get my child to stop sucking the thumb?

Children between ages 2 to 5 years are usually developing the social skills that will allow them to slowly stop their sucking habit. Aggressive treatment is not recommended before this age. An occasional reminder to remove the finger is reasonable, always trying to be positive. Encourage and reward the child for not sucking, praising them for their grown-up behavior. 

Parents sometimes want to tackle the habit problem too early. About half of the children who suck a digit, give the habit up spontaneously at about age three. Many of those who persist will drop the habit about age 6. Loose front teeth and peer pressure will cause many children at this age to give up the habit. If your child persists beyond the age of 6, consulting with your dentist will allow a closer evaluation and the possibility for stopping the habit by other means.

What is the black stain on my child’s teeth?

Black stain is a result of a combination of many things in the mouth related to saliva, bacteria and foods. Black stain on the surfaces of teeth is associated with very low decay rates. No one seems to understand this association and it has been a topic of research. 
Other kinds of stains also appear on the outside of teeth. Green, orange and gray stains are the most common. These stains may indicate poor hygiene and under them early signs of tooth decay may be found. 
Professional cleaning should remove the stain initially, and supervised periodic tooth-brushing helps control the staining.

Should children’s first teeth be flossed?

Dental flossing cleans between the teeth in areas that the toothbrush cannot reach. For some children, it is an important addition to the cleaning routine. 
Primary teeth can have spaces between them, or be very close together. If spaced, they do not require flossing as the toothbrush can reach the areas between teeth. If they are not spaced, children’s teeth should be flossed. At this age children cannot be expected to floss themselves. Parents need to help them. We suggest that you speak to your dental health care giver -dentist, therapist or hygienist- for advice as to the need to floss.

Is it O.K. that my family does not drink tap water?

The question simply cannot be answered with a straight “yes or no”. For various reasons, people may prefer not to drink tap water. In communities where fluoride is naturally present in the water, or where it is added to it, it has been shown to reduce children’s dental decay by up to 50%. If you have this in your community, by not drinking tap water your family is not receiving this inexpensive and terrific preventive tool. 
If you choose not to drink tap water, or if the water in your community does not contain fluoride, your dental professional can advise you if a fluoride supplement can be taken. Even better, brushing your children’s teeth twice a day with the appropriate amount of fluoride toothpaste since the eruption of the first tooth, will insure the fluoride is available surrounding the teeth, where it is most beneficial.

Is it necessary to take fluoride tablets for “strong teeth”?

Fluoride tablets should only be taken on recommendation or prescription from a health care provider. 
Teeth exposed to fluoride are more resistant to tooth decay. If the water in your area does not contain fluoride, your dental provider should be able to evaluate your child’s risk to get cavities, to recommend the appropriate additional fluoride options.

Does my child need a fluoride application at the dentist?

A child’s risk of getting cavities is the main factor in this decision. During your dental appointment the dental team will evaluate the fluoride that your child gets through the water, the toothpaste and other sources. They will also evaluate your child’s diet, nutritional habits, and how well and frequently they floss. This information together with an examination of the child’s teeth, (their shape, closeness, and strength) as well as the gum’s condition will allow the dentist to determine if your child is at risk of getting cavities in the near future. Children who have had cavities recently are also at high risk of developing more cavities.   If your child is at risk of having cavities for any of the reasons mentioned above, they will certainly benefit from the extra protection of a fluoride application during the dental appointment.

Does my child need x-rays?

A child’s history of tooth decay or their risk of getting cavities are the main factors in this decision. If a child has had cavities recently, or if there are no spaces between the teeth to check them directly, the dentist may recommend x-rays as frequently as every 6 months. 
There are other factors that may influence the decision to take x-rays. If a child has had fillings in the past, the dentist may need to x-ray to follow-up on them. Family history may be an influence, especially if other children in the family have many cavities. Most dentists today take x-rays “based on individual need”, rather than routinely. That means they examine the mouth and the child’s history, before making the x-ray decision for the individual patient.

Why are primary teeth filled?

When primary teeth have cavities (decay), it is recommended that they are fixed with a filling. Fillings are placed in the teeth to repair them until they fall out normally. This prevents pain from food getting lodged in the cavity, prevents the cavity from getting larger, and allows the teeth to remain in the mouth until they fall out naturally. When teeth are not fixed, the cavity will get larger and larger until it reaches the nerve causing an infection that can produce an abscess or swelling in the face. Teeth left to decay can lead to unnecessary health problems. 
If teeth are removed early, space may be lost in the dental arch. The end result is that the permanent teeth may become crowded in a mouth that might have had a good, straight set of teeth. 
A third reason that baby teeth are filled is to reduce the bacteria (germs) in the mouth that cause tooth decay. These bacteria multiply in open cavities, were food debris is hard to clean. Eventually, the decay continues on other teeth and even on the permanent teeth when they come into the mouth.

I am worried about my child’s visit to get teeth fixed, is there anything I can do to help?

We would all like the dental visit to be a good experience. There is little point in saving the tooth and losing the child! Research tells us that anxious parents can pass their anxieties to their children. So, try to be relaxed and positive. Treat the visit as a routine part of life and health care. There are children’s books and web sites that can be used to explain procedures. These can be helpful. You may also ask friends and other family members about dental practices that are oriented toward children or about dentists who limit their practice to children. Other children in the dental office and a dental team who look forward to treating children can be a big help to the child.

Why do the gums around my child’s upper teeth bleed when brushing?

The most common cause for gums bleeding is gingivitis, meaning the infection and/or swelling of the gums. This happens when plaque is left for extended periods on the gums, due to poor or insufficient brushing. Some parents and children avoid brushing the gums because they bleed. This is a mistake because it makes the problem worse. Proper gentle brushing on the gums, will remove the plaque deposits and will stop the bleeding. However, it may take 7-10 days of regular, thorough brushing to see full improvement. 
There are other possible reasons for gums bleeding when brushing. A cause may be dehydration or drying of the mouth, usually caused by mouth breathing. Mouth breathing happens when children have difficulty in breathing through the nose due to problems such as allergies, large adenoids or tonsils. Some children have a short upper lip and this prevents the lips closing at night. The mouth is meant to be moist. Bleeding gums are not healthy. Orthodontic correction may be needed to straighten the teeth so that the lips can close comfortably. 
In rare occasions, bleeding gums could be related to medical conditions. Therefore, if there is no improvement in the gums after regular brushing, consult with your dentist.

Does it matter that my child had a primary tooth removed?

Yes, it may be a problem later on especially if back teeth are lost early. It usually is not a problem for the front teeth. Primary teeth are a specific size and occupy a certain amount of space in the jaw. If a primary tooth is removed early, the nearby teeth may drift into the space that has been created by the lost tooth. This means there will be insufficient space in the future for the permanent tooth that will replace the lost tooth. The end result is that the way the teeth bite together may be affected.

If my dentist recommends fillings, should they be white or silver?

Repairing teeth is a difficult job. The type of filling depends upon many things such as the size and location of the cavity, the age of the child and above all, the ability of the child to cooperate for the procedures. Some dentists prefer one type of filling material over another and some of these factors will influence their decisions. Some dentists also use pre-made silver crowns. These are used when there is a lot of tooth damage. Talk to your clinician about the choices.

What is a space maintainer?

A space maintainer is an appliance that protects space in the jaw that is created when a tooth is lost prematurely. There are two general types of space maintainers. Fixed space maintainers are held to the teeth by a dental cement. Removable space maintainers can be taken out and cleaned. The design of a space maintainer depends upon the teeth missing, the teeth present and the child’s tooth development.

Children 0-2 years of ageChildren 2-5 years of age
Children 6-10 years of ageChildren 10+ years of age

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Niños de 2 a 5 años de edad

A los dos años de edad, ¿están ya presentes todos los dientes primarios (comunes en los bebés)?

Hay mucha variación entre los niños. La respuesta probable es… ¡no! Los dientes primarios comienzan a erupcionar alrededor de los 6 meses de edad. Cerca de los dos años de edad, generalemente 16 dientes, ya están presentes y el último de los molares empieza a salir, pero no terminan de erupcionar sino hasta los 30 meses, aproximadamente. Los molares superiores suelen ser los últimos en entrar. Haga clic para ver el gráfico.

¿Qué tipo de cepillo de dientes se recomienda usar?

Hay muchos tipos de cepillos de dientes en el mercado. Algunos fabricantes se especializan en el desarrollo de los cepillos de dientes para los niños.
En lugar de sugerirle una marca, nos gustaría que pensara en lo que usted busca en un cepillo de dientes para un niño de 2 a 5 años de edad. Busque un cepillo con un mango corto y ancho, ya que esto le facilita el uso del mismo a su pequeño. Las cerdas deben ser suaves para evitar lesiones.

¿Con qué frecuencia se recomienda limpiarle los dientes a mi pequeño?

Uno de los aspectos más importantes acerca de un programa de limpieza dental es el desarrollo de buenos hábitos. El cepillado se debe hacer por lo menos dos veces al día – por la mañana y antes de acostarse. Por supuesto, si se hace más a menudo es mucho más efectivo, especialmente después de las comidas o bocadillos dulces. La mayor prevención contra las caries, ocurre cuando el cepillado con pasta de dientes con fluoruro es supervisado por los padres.

¿Cuánta pasta de dientes es seguro usar para lavarle los dientes a mi pequeño?

De 0 a 3 años de edad= 
del tamaño de un grano de arroz

De 3 a 6 años de edad= 
del tamaño de una arveja

 

 

 

 

 

Como se mencionó en la sección anterior, los niños de 0 a 3 años deben usar una cantidad de pasta de dientes con fluoruro igual al tamaño de un grano de arroz dos veces al día. Los niños de 3 a 6 años de edad deben usar una cantidad igual al tamaño de una arveja. Esta cantidad es segura incluso si se ingiere, sin embargo, es mejor enseñarle a su niño a escupir el exceso de pasta de dientes. NO es necesario enjuagar, ya que la mayor protección contra las caries requiere solamente cepillar y escupir.

¿Qué puedo hacer si a mi hijo no le gusta la pasta de dientes?

De 0 a 3 años:

El cepillado es importante, ya que permite eliminar los restos de comida de alrededor de los dientes y las encías. Sin embargo, la pasta de dientes con 1000 ppm de fluoruro hace que los dientes sean más resistentes al deterioro haciendo que la capa dental externa (esmalte) sea más fuerte. Si la pasta de dientes no tiene fluoruro, este beneficio se pierde. Las cremas dentales también ayudan a tener un aliento agradable y fresco. Diferentes marcas ofrecen diversos sabores.

De 3 a 6 años:

Usted puede probar varias pastas de dientes para encontrar la que le guste más a su hijo. De esta manera, usted lo/la ayudará a acostumbrarse a la rutina del cepillado. Solamente asegúrese siempre de utilizar la cantidad adecuada de pasta de dientes: del tamaño de un grano de arroz para niños entre los 0 y los 3 años y del tamaño de una arveja para niños de 3 a 6.

 

 

¿Por qué los dientes superiores e inferiores de mi hijo no se juntan?

Esto es típico de lo que los dentistas llaman una “mordida abierta”. Esta situación se puede ver en los niños más pequeños (de 2 a 5 años) y en algunos mayores también. Hay varias razones por las que esto puede ocurrir. Una de las causas más comunes de una mordida abierta es el hábito. Chuparse los dedos o los pulgares, colocando la lengua y algunos otros objetos entre los dientes (como un chupón) todos son hábitos que pueden causar este problema. También puede ser un rasgo de familia.
Hay opciones para tratar con las mordidas abiertas debido a los hábitos. La condición puede quedar sin tratamiento. Hay varias maneras en las que un hábito puede ser eliminado, y cuando esto se logra a edades tempranas, muy a menudo los dientes se mueven a una mejor posición sin tratamiento adicional. Su proveedor de cuidado dental debe ser consultado si su hijo tiene alguno de estos hábitos.

¿Qué sugiere para que mi hijo deje de succionar el dedo?

Los niños entre los 2 y los 5 años de edad suelen desarrollar habilidades sociales que les permitirán detener lentamente su hábito de succión. Los tratamientos agresivos no se recomiendan antes de esta edad. Un recordatorio ocasional para quitar el dedo es razonable, siempre tratando de ser positivo. Aliente y recompense al niño por no succionar, alabándolo por su comportamiento maduro.
Los padres a veces quieren abordar el problema del hábito demasiado pronto. Alrededor de la mitad de los niños que se succionan un dedo, renuncian al hábito espontáneamente a los tres años. Muchos de los que persisten dejarán el hábito alrededor de los 6 años. Los dientes delanteros sueltos y la presión de algunos de sus compañeros harán que muchos niños renuncien al hábito a esa edad. Si su hijo persiste pasando los 6 años de edad, consultar con su dentista permitirá una evaluación más cercana y la posibilidad de detener el hábito por otros medios.

¿Qué son esas manchas negras en los dientes de mi hijo?

Las manchas negras son el resultado de una combinación de muchas cosas en la boca relacionadas con la saliva, bacterias y alimentos. Las manchas negras en la superficie de los dientes están asociadas con tasas de deterioro muy bajas. Nadie parece entender esta asociación y ha sido un tema de investigación. 
Otros tipos de manchas también aparecen en el exterior de los dientes. Las manchas verdes, naranjas y grises son las más comunes. Estas manchas pueden indicar una mala higiene y debajo de ellas se pueden encontrar signos tempranos de caries. 
La limpieza profesional debe quitar la mancha inicialmente, y el cepillado periódico supervisado ayuda a controlar la tinción.

¿Los dientes primarios de los niños deben ser limpiados con hilo dental?

El hilo dental limpia las áreas entre los dientes que el cepillo no puede alcanzar. Para algunos niños, es una adición importante a la rutina de limpieza.
Los dientes primarios pueden tener espacios entre ellos, o estar muy juntos. Si están espaciados, no requieren el uso del hilo dental ya que el cepillo de dientes puede alcanzar las áreas entre ellos. Si no están espaciados, se tiene que hacer uso del hilo dental. A esta edad, los niños no pueden limpiarse los dientes utilizando el hilo dental. Los padres necesitan ayudarlos. Le sugerimos que hable con su proveedor de atención dental -dentista, terapeuta o higienista- para obtener asesorías sobre la necesidad de usar hilo dental.

¿Está bien que mi familia no beba agua del grifo?

La pregunta simplemente no se puede responder con una respuesta tan simple como un “sí o no”. Por varias razones, la gente prefiere no beber agua del grifo. En las comunidades donde el fluoruro está naturalmente presente en el agua, o donde se le agrega, se ha demostrado que se han reducido las caries infantiles en hasta un 50%. Si usted tiene esto en su comunidad, al no beber agua del grifo, su familia no está recibiendo esta herramienta preventiva barata y excelente. 
Si usted decide no beber agua del grifo, o si el agua en su comunidad no contiene fluoruro, su dentista de confianza puede aconsejarle sobre algún suplemento de fluoruro que pudiera tomar. Mejor aún, cepillando los dientes de sus hijos dos veces al día con la cantidad adecuada de pasta de dientes con fluoruro desde que sale el primer diente, asegurará que el fluoruro esté disponible alrededor de los dientes, donde es más beneficioso.

¿Es necesario tomar tabletas de fluoruro para tener “dientes fuertes”?

Las tabletas de fluoruro sólo deben tomarse bajo recomendación o prescripción de un proveedor de atención médica.
Los dientes expuestos al fluoruro son más resistentes a las caries. Si el agua en su área no contiene fluoruro, su proveedor dental debe ser capaz de evaluar el riesgo de su hijo para obtener caries y recomendar las opciones adicionales de fluoruro adicionales.

¿Necesita mi hijo una aplicación de fluoruro cuando vaya al dentista?

El riesgo de un niño de tener caries es el factor principal en esta decisión. Durante su cita con el dentista, el equipo dental evaluará el fluoruro que su hijo recibe a través del agua, la pasta de dientes y otras fuentes. También evaluarán la dieta de su hijo, sus hábitos alimenticios, y cuán bien y con cuanta frecuencia usa el hilo dental. Esta información, junto con un examen de los dientes del niño (su forma, cercanía y fuerza), así como la condición de las encías permitirá al dentista para determinar si su hijo está en riesgo de sufrir caries en el futuro cercano. Los niños que han tenido caries recientemente también están en alto riesgo de desarrollar aun más. Si su hijo está en riesgo de tener caries por cualquiera de las razones mencionadas anteriormente, sin duda se beneficiará de la protección adicional de una aplicación de fluoruro durante la cita dental.

¿Mi hijo necesita radiografías?

El historial de caries de un niño o su riesgo de tenerlas son los principales factores en esta decisión. Si un niño ha tenido caries recientemente, o si no hay espacio suficiente entre los dientes para revisarlo, el dentista puede indicar que le realicen radiografías cada 6 meses.
Hay otros factores que pueden influir en la decisión de tomar radiografías. Si a un niño se le han restaurado cavidades en el pasado, el dentista puede necesitar una radiografía para darle seguimiento. El historial familiar puede ser una influencia, especialmente si otros niños en la familia han tenido muchas caries. La mayoría de los dentistas recurren a las radiografías “basados en su necesidad individual” en vez de hacerlo rutinariamente. Eso significa que examinan la boca y el historial del niño, antes de tomar la decisión de mandar al paciente individual a que le hagan una radiografía.

¿Por qué son llenados los dientes primarios?

Cuando los dientes primarios tienen caries (deterioro), se recomienda que sean tratados con una restauración. Las restauraciones se colocan en los dientes para repararlos hasta que se caen normalmente. Esto evita que los alimentos que pudieran alojarse en la caries causen dolor, evita que ésta se vuelva más grande y permite a los dientes permanecer en la boca hasta que se caen naturalmente. Cuando los dientes con caries no son restaurados, éstas se harán más y más grandes hasta que lleguen al nervio, causando una infección que puede producir un absceso o hinchazón en la cara. Los dientes dejados para que se deterioren pueden llevar a problemas de salud innecesarios.
Si los dientes son extraídos antes de tiempo, se puede perder espacio en el arco dental. El resultado final es que los dientes permanentes se pueden amontonar en una boca que pudo haber tenido un buen conjunto de dientes rectos. 
Una tercera razón para que los dientes de su bebé sean restaurados es reducir las bacterias (gérmenes) en la boca que causan las caries. Estas bacterias se multiplican en caries abiertas cuando los restos de comida son difíciles de limpiar. Eventualmente, el deterioro continúa en otros dientes, incluso en los permanentes cuando salen en la boca.

Estoy preocupado por la visita de mi hijo para que le arreglen los dientes, ¿hay algo que pueda hacer para ayudar?

A todos nos gustaría que la visita dental fuera una buena experiencia. ¡No hay mucho sentido en salvar al diente y perder al niño! La investigación nos dice que los padres ansiosos pueden transmitir sus ansiedades a sus hijos. Por lo tanto, trate de estar relajado/a y positivo/a. Tome la visita como una parte rutinaria de la vida y la atención médica. Hay libros infantiles y sitios web que pueden usarse para explicar los procedimientos. Estos pueden ser útiles. También puede preguntar a los amigos y otros miembros de la familia sobre las prácticas dentales que están orientadas hacia los niños o sobre los dentistas que limitan su práctica solamente a ellos. Otros niños en la sala de espera del consultorio y un equipo dental que preparado para tratar a los niños pueden ser de gran ayuda para su pequeño/a.

¿Por qué las encías alrededor de los dientes de mi hijo sangran al cepillarse los dientes?

La causa más común del sangrado de las encías es la gingivitis, que es la infección e inflamación de las encías. Esto ocurre cuando la placa se deja durante períodos prolongados en las encías, debido a un cepillado deficiente o insuficiente. Algunos padres y niños evitan cepillarse las encías porque sangran. Este es un error porque empeora el problema. El cepillado suave adecuado sobre las encías eliminará los depósitos de la placa y detendrá el sangrado. Sin embargo, puede tomar de 7 a 10 días de cepillado regular y completo para ver la mejora total.
Hay otras razones posibles para que las encías sangren al cepillarse. Una causa puede ser la deshidratación o el secado de la boca, generalmente causada por la respiración bucal. La respiración bucal ocurre cuando los niños tienen dificultad para respirar por la nariz debido a problemas como alergias, adenoides o amígdalas grandes. Algunos niños tienen el labio superior corto y esto evita que los labios se cierren por la noche. La boca está hecha para estar húmeda y las encías sangrantes no son saludables. Por ello, la corrección ortodóncica puede ser necesaria para enderezar los dientes y para lograr que los labios se puedan cerrar cómodamente. 
Rara vez, el sangrado en las encías puede estar relacionado con condiciones médicas. Por lo tanto, si no hay mejora en las encías después del cepillado regular, consulte a su dentista.

¿Es malo si a mi hijo le fue extraído un diente primario?

Sí, puede ser un problema más adelante, especialmente si los dientes posteriores se pierden antes de tiempo. Generalmente no es un problema para los dientes frontales. Los dientes primarios tienen un tamaño específico y ocupan una cierta cantidad de espacio en la mandíbula. Si un diente primario se extrae antes de tiempo, los dientes cercanos pueden desviarse hacia el espacio que ha sido creado por el diente perdido. Esto significa que habrá espacio insuficiente en el futuro para el diente permanente que reemplazará al diente perdido. El resultado final es que la forma en que los dientes ocluyen juntos puede verse afectada.

Si mi dentista recomienda restauraciones, ¿deberían ser blancas o plateadas?

Reparar los dientes es un trabajo difícil. El tipo de restauración depende de muchas cosas tales como el tamaño y ubicación de la cavidad, la edad del niño y, sobre todo, la capacidad del niño para cooperar durante los procedimientos. Algunos dentistas prefieren un tipo de material de restauración en particular y algunos de estos factores influirán en sus decisiones. Algunos dentistas también utilizan coronas de acero pre-fabricadas cuando los dientes han sido ya muy dañados. Consulte a su dentista sobre las opciones.

 

¿Qué es un mantenedor de espacio?

Un mantenedor de espacio es un aparato que protege el espacio que se crea en la mandíbula cuando un diente se pierde prematuramente. Hay dos tipos generales de mantenedores de espacio. Los mantenedores de espacio fijos son sujetados a los dientes por un cemento dental. Los mantenedores de espacio removibles pueden sacarse y limpiarse. El diseño de un mantenedor de espacio depende de los dientes perdidos, los dientes presentes y el desarrollo del diente del niño.

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Crianças entre 2-5 anos de idade

Aos dois anos de idade, todos os dentes decíduos estão presentes?

Há uma enorme variação entre as crianças. A resposta provável é não! Os dentes decíduos começam a nascer aos 6 meses de idade. Geralmente, ao 2 anos, 16 dentes estão presentes e o último dos molares começam a aparecer, mas eles não finalizam a erupção até cerca dos 30 meses de idade. Os molares superiores são geralmente os últimos a erupcionarem. Clique para ver o gráfico.

Que tipo de escova de dente você recomenda?

Existem muitos tipos de escovas dentais no mercado. Alguns fabricantes são especializados no desenvolvimento de escovas de dentes para crianças. Ao invés de oferecer um nome de marca, gostaríamos que você pensasse sobre o que você quer em uma escova de dente para uma criança de 2 a 5 anos de idade. Procure por uma escova com uma alça curta e volumosa, pois esta é a forma mais fácil para a criança manusear a escova. As cerdas devem ser macias para evitar ferimentos.

Quantas vezes você recomenda a limpeza dos dentes?

Uma das coisas mais importantes sobre um plano de limpeza dentária é o desenvolvimento de bons hábitos. A escovação dentária deve ser realizada pelo menos duas vezes por dia – de manhã e na hora de dormir. Naturalmente, se for feito de forma mais frequente é benéfico, especialmente após as refeições ou injestão de doces. A maior prevenção contra cáries, acontece quando a escovação com pasta dental com flúor é supervisionada pelos pais.

Qual a quantidade de pasta dental é seguro usar em minha criança?

0-3 anos = tamanho de um grão de arroz

3-6 anos = tamanho de uma ervilha

Como mencionado na seção anterior, crianças de 0-3 anos devem usar uma quantidade de pasta dental fluoretada similar ao tamanho de um grão de arroz duas vezes por dia. Crianças de 3 a 6 anos de idade devem usar uma quantidade similar ao tamanho de uma ervilha. Esta quantidade é segura, mesmo se engolida, no entanto, é uma boa idéia ensinar o seu filho a cuspir o excesso da pasta dental. Bochecho não se faz necessário, uma vez que a maior proteção contra cárie resulta da escovação.

O que pode ser feito se o meu filho não gostar de pasta dental?

idade: 0-3

A escovação é importante, pois permite remover os detritos de alimentos ao redor dos dentes e da gengiva. No entanto, pasta dental com 1000 ppm de flúor torna o dente mais resistente a cárie dentária, uma vez que torna a camada externa do dente (esmalte) mais forte. Sem pasta dental com flúor este benefício é perdido. Dentifrícios também ajudam a ter uma respiração agradável. Diferentes marcas têm sabores diferentes.

idade: 3-6

Você pode tentar várias pastas dentais, até encontrar uma que o seu filho goste. Desta forma você vai ajudá-lo a se acostumar com a rotina da escovação. Apenas certifique-se de sempre usar a quantidade certa de pasta de dente: tamanho de um grão de arroz para 0-3 anos e tamanho de uma ervilha para crianças de 3 a 6 anos de idade.

Por que os dentes superiores e inferiores do meu filho não ficam juntos?

Esta é típica “mordida aberta”. Esta situação pode ser vista em crianças mais jovens (2 a 5 anos) e em alguns mais velhos também. Existem várias razões pelas quais isso pode ocorrer. Uma das causas mais comuns de uma mordida aberta é o hábito.  Chupar dedos, colocar a língua e segurar objetos entre os dentes (como uma chupeta, por exemplo) são hábitos que podem causar este problema. Também pode ser um traço familiar. Existem formas de lidar com mordidas abertas devido aos hábitos. Existem várias maneiras com a qual um hábito pode ser eliminado. Quando isto acontece, os dentes, frequentemente movem-se para trás em uma posição melhor, não havendo necessidade de tratamento adicional. Seu dentista deve ser consultado se o seu filho tiver algum desses hábitos.

O que você sugere para que o meu filho pare de chupar o dedo?

Crianças entre 2 a 5 anos de idade estão geralmente desenvolvendo habilidades sociais que lhes permitem parar com o hábito de sucção lentamente. Tratamento agressivo não é recomendado antes desta idade. Um lembrete ocasional para remover o dedo é razoável, sempre tentando ser positivo. Incentive e recompense a criança pela não sucção, elogiando-a pelo seu comportamento adulto.
Os pais muitas vezes querem resolver o problema do hábito muito cedo. Cerca da metade das crianças que chupam o dedo, deixam este hábito espontaneamente, ao redor dos três anos. Muitos daqueles que persistem deixarão o hábito por volta dos 6 anos de idade. Dentes anteriores amolecidos e a pressão do grupo farão com que muitas crianças nesta idade deixem o hábito. Se o seu filho persistir após os 6 anos de idade, a consulta com o seu dentista irá permitir uma avaliação mais profunda e uma maior possibilidade de parar com hábito por outros meios.

O que é a mancha negra nos dentes do meu filho?

Mancha negra é o resultado de uma combinação de muitas coisas na boca relacionadas com saliva, bactérias e alimentos. A mancha negra na superfície dos dentes está associada a uma taxa de cárie muito baixa. Ninguém parece entender essa associação e tem sido um tema de pesquisa. Outros tipos de manchas também aparecem na parte externa dos dentes. Manchas verdes, laranjas e cinzas são as mais comuns. Estas manchas indicam higiene precária e sob estas, podem ser encontrados os primeiros sinais de cárie dentária.
Limpeza profissional deve remover a mancha inicialmente, e uma escovação dentária supervisionada periodicamente ajuda a controlar a mancha.

O fio dental deve ser usado nos primeiros dentes das crianças?

O fio dental limpa entre os dentes, nas áreas que a escova dental não alcança. Para algumas crianças, é importante adicionar esta rotina na hora de limpar os dentes.
Os dentes decíduos podem ter espaços entre eles, ou ser muito próximos uns aos outros. Se espaçados, eles não precisam do uso do fio dental, pois a escova pode atingir as áreas entre os dentes. Se os dentes não são espaçados, recomenda-se o uso do fio dental. Nessa idade, não se pode esperar que as crianças usem fio dental sozinhas. Os pais precisam ajudá-las. Sugerimos que você fale com seu dentista para obtenção de conselhos sobre a necessidade do uso do fio dental.

É OK que a minha família não beba água da torneira?

A pergunta simplesmente não pode ser respondida com um direto “sim ou não”. Por várias razões, as pessoas preferem não beber água da torneira. Em comunidades onde o flúor está naturalmente presente na água, ou é adicionado a esta, observou-se uma redução de até 50% da cárie dental nas crianças.
Se você tem isso em sua comunidade, e não bebe água da torneira, sua família não está recebendo esta ferramenta barata e preventiva. Se você optar por não beber água da torneira, ou se a água em sua comunidade não contém flúor, o seu dentista pode aconselhá-lo um suplemento de flúor se houver necessidade.
Ainda melhor, escovar os dentes dos seus filhos duas vezes por dia com a quantidade adequada de pasta dental com flúor desde a erupção do primeiro dente, irá assegurar que o flúor estará disponível ao redor dos dentes, região considerada mais benéfica.

É necessário tomar comprimidos de flúor para “fortalecer os dentes”?

Os comprimidos de flúor só devem ser tomados sob recomendação ou prescrição médica.
Os dentes expostos ao flúor são mais resistentes à cárie dentária. Se a água em sua área não contém flúor, seu dentista deve ser capaz de avaliar o risco do seu filho em obter cárie, e recomendar as opções de flúor adicionais adequadas.

O meu filho precisa de aplicar de flúor no dentista?

O risco à cárie de uma criança é o principal fator dessa decisão. Durante a consulta, o dentista irá avaliar a quantidade de flúor que seu filho recebe através da água, da pasta de dente e de outras fontes. Também será avaliado a dieta de seu filho, os hábitos nutricionais e quão bem e com que frequência o fio dental é utilizado. Esta informação, juntamente com um exame dentário (sua forma, proximidade e força), bem como a condição da gengiva permitirá que o dentista determine se o risco à cárie do seu filho. As crianças que tiveram cáries recentemente tem um alto risco de desenvolver mais cáries. Se o seu filho está em risco de ter cáries por qualquer das razões acima mencionadas, eles certamente irão se beneficiar de uma proteção extra de flúor durante a consulta odontológica.

O meu filho precisa de raio-x?

A história de cárie dentária da criança ou o seu risco de obter cáries são os principais fatores desta decisão. Se a criança teve cárie recentemente, ou se não houver espaços entre os dentes para avaliar diretamente, o dentista pode recomendar raios-x a cada 6 meses.
Existem outros fatores que podem influenciar a decisão de tirar raios-x. Se a criança teve restaurações no passado, o dentista pode precisar do raio-x para acompanhar. História na família pode ser uma influência, especialmente se outras crianças na família têm muitas cárie. A maioria dos dentistas hoje solicita raios-x “com base na necessidade individual”, ao invés de rotineiramente. Isso significa que eles examinam a boca e a história da criança, antes de tomar a decisão de solicitor o raio-x.

Por que os dentes decíduos são restaurados?

Quando os dentes decíduos têm cárie, recomenda-se que sejam restaurados. Restaurações são colocados nos dentes para repará-los até que caiam normalmente. Isso previne que alimentos se acumulem na cavidade cariada; impede o aumento da cavidade, e permite que os dentes permaneçam na boca até que caim naturalmente. Quando os dentes não são restaurados, a cavidade tende a ficar maior, podendo chegar ao nervo, o que gera infecção, produção de abscesso e/ou inchaço na face. Dentes cariados sem tratamento podem levar a problemas de saúde desnecessários.
Se os dentes são removidos precocemente, o espaço pode ser perdido no arco dental. O resultado final é que os dentes permanentes podem ficar tortos na boca.
Uma terceira razão que os dentes de bebê devem ser restaurados é para reduzir bactérias (germes) causadoras de cárie dentária. Essas bactérias se multiplicam em cavidades abertas, onde os detritos de alimentos são difíceis de limpar. Eventualmente, a cárie continua em outros dentes e até mesmo nos dentes permanentes quando entram em erup ção.

Estou preocupaao com a visita do meu filho ao dentista para consertar os dentes. Há algo que eu possa fazer para ajudar?

Todos nós gostaríamos de ter uma boa experiência no dentista. Pesquisa reporta que pais ansiosos podem passar suas ansiedades aos seus filhos. Então, tente ficar relaxado e positivo. Trate a consulta ao dentista como uma parte rotineira da vida e dos cuidados de saúde. Existem livros infantis e sites que podem ser usados para explicar os procedimentos. Isto pode ser útil. Você também pode perguntar aos amigos e outros membros da família sobre práticas odontológicas que são orientadas para as crianças ou sobre dentistas que limitam o seu atendimento às crianças. Outras crianças no consultório e uma equipe odontológica que tratam de crianças podem ser de grande ajuda.

Por que a gengiva ao redor dos dentes do meu filho sangra ao escovar?

A causa mais comum para sangramento gengival é gengivite, ou seja, infecção e/ou inchaço da gengiva. Isso acontece quando placa dentária é deixada por períodos prolongados na gengiva, devido à uma escovação pobre ou insuficiente. Alguns pais e crianças evitam escovar a gengiva devido ao sangramento. Este é um erro porque torna o problema ainda pior. Escovação suave adequada sobre a gengiva, irá remover os depósitos de placa, que leva ao fim do sangramento. No entanto, pode demorar de 7a 10 dias para ver uma melhora total.
Existem outras razões de sangramento gengival durante a escovação. Uma causa pode ser desidratação da boca, geralmente causada por uma respiração bucal. Respiração bucal acontece quando as crianças têm dificuldade em respirar pelo nariz devido a problemas como alergias, adenóides ou amígdalas. Algumas crianças têm um lábio superior curto e isso impede que os lábios se fechem à noite. A boca é para ser úmida. Sangramento gengival não é saudável. Correção ortodôntica pode ser necessária para corrigir os dentes, levando ao fechamento confortável dos lábios.
Em raras ocasiões, sangramento gengival pode estar relacionados a condições médicas. Portanto, se não houver melhora na gengiva após a escovação regular, consulte o seu dentista.

É importante se o meu filho tiver um dente decíduo removido?

Sim, isto pode ser um problema mais tarde, especialmente se os dentes posteriores são perdidos precocemente. Geralmente, isto não é um problema para os dentes anteriores. Dentes decíduos possuem um tamanho específico e ocupam um certo espaço na mandíbula/maxila. Se um dente decíduo é removido de forma precoce, os dentes vizinhos podem se movimentar para o espaço que foi criado pelo dente perdido. Isto significa que haverá espaço insuficiente para o dente permanente que irá substituir o dente perdido. Como resultado final observa-se um arco dental comprometido.

Se o meu dentista recomendar restauração, esta deve ser feita com resina ou amalgáma?

Reparar dentes é um trabalho difícil. O tipo de restauração depende de muitos aspectos, tais como o tamanho e a localização da cavidade, a idade da criança e acima de tudo, da capacidade da criança em cooperar com a realização do procedimento. Alguns dentistas preferem um tipo de material de restauração sobre outros, e estes fatores influenciarão suas decisões. Alguns dentistas também usam coroas de prata pré-fabricadas. Estas são usados quando há um grande dano dentário. Converse com seu dentista sobre as opções.

O que é um mantenedor de espaço?

Um mantenedor de espaço é um aparelho que protege o espaço na mandíbula/maxila que é criado quando um dente é perdido prematuramente. Existem dois tipos de mantenedores de espaço. Os mantenedores de espaço fixo, que são mantidos aos dentes por um cemento dental. E, os mantenedores de espaço removíveis, os quais podem ser retirados e limpos. O modelo de um mantenedor de espaço depende dos dentes ausentes, do dentes presentes e do desenvolvimento  dentário da criança.

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Frequently Asked Questions

When will my child start getting permanent teeth?

The arrival of permanent teeth occurs at 6 years +/- 6 months. With the exception of the wisdom teeth, the last of the permanent teeth come in around 12 years of age. 
Tooth eruption can be variable. Girls tend to get teeth earlier than boys. However it is not so much the timing that is important as the sequence of tooth eruption. When individual teeth are delayed, this could indicate local problems. A good reason to see your dentist regularly is to have development supervised.

My child lost the baby teeth a few months ago and the new teeth have not grown in. Should I be worried?

Sometimes when the children lose a baby tooth the new tooth is right there and you can see it immediately. Sometimes it takes months for them to start coming into the mouth. This is related to many factors like the amount of space available for the tooth to grow, the position of the individual tooth, and even family traits.  Ask your dentist this question as your child loses the first tooth. Your dentist or hygienist can go over the radiographs of your child to tell you what to expect, and make you aware of any potential problems.

How can I prevent my child from getting cavities as he/she starts growing permanent teeth?

As children start school, they also start increasing their independence with daily habits and food choices in and out of the home. To insure your child continues to have healthy teeth and body:

When do children begin to floss their own teeth?

Flossing teeth is difficult. Children acquire these abilities at different rates. Studies with 7 to 8 year olds have shown that many of the children do not have the ability to self-floss at this time. Consequently, at about 8 to 10 years of age we suggest that children can be introduced to self-flossing. Begin by learning to floss the front teeth. Then, when they can do this well, begin to floss in the back of the mouth.
Alternately, even young children can use flossers with a handle to make it easier to practice alone and gives easier access for parents to help.
It is important to floss correctly. Your dental team can help you learn.

Why are my child’s new front teeth more yellow than the baby teeth next to them?

Newly erupted permanent teeth have large pulps and their enamel is more translucent than the very white opaque enamel of baby teeth. This makes them seem like they are more yellow in contrast. As the tooth develops more, the color will tend to look lighter and blend-in more with the surrounding teeth. As more permanent teeth grow next to each other, their color will also look more uniform and lighter. If you want your children’s teeth to look their whitest, brushing gently twice a day with fluoride toothpaste will remove the debris and stain that could make them look even more yellow, while keeping them healthy.
 

What can be done for my child who is still thumb sucking?

Most experts think that by 6 years of age, when the permanent teeth start to come in, is the proper age to treat the habit. 
We like to see the habit discontinued because it can push the new teeth into poor alignment. Finger sucking encourages the upper teeth to protrude. It also can be associated with poor speech, social stresses and other habits. These habits are treated with psychologically based programs and/or mouth appliances. Correction of the habit is sometimes not easy. Your dentist should be able to evaluate and recommend which method is most suited for your child’s individual situation.

Why does my child have two rows of teeth?

The most common site for this to occur is in the lower front tooth region. It happens in 30% of children. The appearance of two rows of teeth is due to the permanent teeth coming in behind the primary teeth. This is usually caused by a discrepancy between the size of the new teeth, and the space available for them to grow.
Your dentist should be consulted. An x-ray may be needed to determine how much of the root of the primary tooth remains. Sometimes the primary teeth need removal but in many cases, if the primary teeth are already loose, they fall out after a few weeks.

Why does my child have a large space between the new front teeth?

A large space sometimes is noticed when the two upper front teeth come in. This space is called a diastema. The easy answer is that this is a normal part of jaw development. As more teeth arrive, the space tends to close. When the eye teeth arrive near the teenage years, the space is usually closed. For the most part, presence of a diastema before age 12 is usually an indication that the permanent teeth will have enough room to grow straight. However, there can be other causes for space between front teeth and the area may need x-ray investigation by your dentist to rule out any potential problems.

Do many children have missing teeth?

About 1 in 20 people have variations in the number of teeth. Some have extra teeth and some have missing teeth. Missing teeth are more common in the permanent dentition than in the primary set of teeth. Some people only have one or two missing teeth. There may be no apparent reason for this occurrence or it may be something that other family members have as well. Some people have numerous missing teeth. This could be related to some type of systemic condition.  Your dentist can help make a plan to manage the space so the children can retain proper function in spite of the missing teeth; he/she can also coordinate the treatment with the orthodontist to properly manage the space and possible replacement in the long term.

Why do children need sealants?

When teeth first come into the mouth they are more at risk for tooth decay. The permanent teeth that benefit the most from getting sealants are the permanent molars. The first molars arrive at about 6 years of age and often have deep grooves on the chewing surfaces. Tooth brushing is often not enough to clean these grooves properly, so over the years many of these new molars will get tooth decay. The sealant is a protective hard coating that fills-in the deep grooves in the chewing surfaces of the back teeth, so that food cannot collect in them. The smooth surface also makes the tooth easier to clean. This prevents them from decaying! Sealants have a long track of being safe, and they are the most effective way to prevent cavities in the chewing surfaces of back teeth. Sealants are usually placed on permanent teeth, but if children are at risk of developing new cavities in the chewing surfaces of primary back teeth, they can benefit from having sealants placed on their primary teeth too.

Does my child need a mouthguard for sports?

Mouthguards help lessen injuries to mouth and teeth. They are used in many sports where there is a possibility of injury.
Mouthguards are best fitted from a mold of your child’s teeth or they can be purchased commercially. The custom fitted mouthguard is a superior fit. This makes it easier for the child to talk wearing the appliance and it offers better protection. However, for a child in the 6 to 9 age bracket, teeth are constantly falling out and being replaced. It may be more practical for this age group to purchase the commercial guards. The more expensive fitted guards can be purchased when all the permanent teeth are in place. Note that mouthguards can also be made and strongly recommended for children wearing braces.
 

If a child has bad primary teeth, will they have bad permanent teeth?

This does not have to be the case. To have dental decay we need teeth, germs in the mouth and sweet foods. If germs collect in large numbers and sweet foods are eaten regularly and allowed to remain in the mouth without being brushed away, we have a recipe for tooth decay. Sadly, bad habits like eating sweet foods and drinks too often and not brushing with fluoride toothpaste can often persist for a long time and after causing cavities in primary teeth, go on to cause cavities on permanent teeth as they come into the mouth. Children who have cavities on their baby teeth have a lot more chances of having cavities on their permanent teeth. But a lifestyle change with a nutritious diet that limits sugar, proper brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, and regular dental visits can change the mouth environment completely, giving the new teeth a chance to grow healthy. So, bad permanent teeth do not have to follow bad primary teeth.

Children 0-2 years of ageChildren 2-5 years of age
Children 6-10 years of ageChildren 10+ years of age

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Niños de 6 a 10 años de edad

¿Cuándo empezarán a salirle a mi hijo los dientes permanentes?

La erupción de los dientes permanentes ocurre a los 6 años y medio aproximadamente. Con la excepción de las muelas del juicio, el último de los dientes permanentes erupciona alrededor de los 12 años de edad. 
El brote de los dientes puede ser variable. Las niñas tienden a tener dientes antes que los niños. Sin embargo, no es tanto el momento que es importante como la secuencia de erupción de los dientes. El retraso de los dientes individuales podría indicar problemas locales. Una buena razón para ver a su dentista regularmente es para tener un desarrollo supervisado.

Mi hijo perdió los dientes primarios hace unos meses y los nuevos dientes no han erupcionado aún ¿Debería estar preocupado?

A veces, cuando los niños pierden un diente primario, el diente nuevo está allí y se puede ver de inmediato. A veces se necesitan meses para que empiecen a erupcionar en boca. Esto está relacionado con muchos factores como la cantidad de espacio disponible para que el diente crezca, la posición del diente individual e incluso los rasgos de la familia. Aclare con su dentista esta pregunta cuando su hijo pierda el primer diente. Su dentista o higienista puede revisar las radiografías de su hijo para decirle qué esperar y hacerle consciente de cualquier problema potencial. 

¿Cómo puedo evitar que mi hijo tenga caries mientras comienzan a crecerle los dientes permanentes?

A medida que los niños comienzan a ir a la escuela, también comienzan a aumentar su independencia con los hábitos diarios y las opciones de alimentos dentro y fuera del hogar. Para asegurarse de que su hijo continúe teniendo su cuerpo y dientes sanos:

¿Cuándo empiezan los niños a usar hilo dental sin ayuda?

Usar el hilo dental es difícil. Los niños adquieren estas habilidades a diferentes ritmos. Estudios con niños de 7 a 8 años de edad han demostrado que muchos de ellos no tienen la capacidad de usar el hilo dental en esa etapa. En consecuencia, entre los 8 y 10 años de edad, sugerimos que a los niños se les empiece a enseñar a usar correctamente el hilo dental. Comience aprendiendo a usarlo en los dientes frontales. Después, cuando puedan hacerlo bien, que comiencen a aprender en la parte posterior de la boca.
Alternativamente, incluso los niños pequeños pueden usar sedas con mango para que la práctica sola sea más sencilla y facilitar el acceso de los padres para ayudarlos.
Es importante usar el hilo dental correctamente. Su equipo odontológico puede ayudarle a aprender.

¿Por qué los nuevos dientes frontales de mi hijo son más amarillos que los dientes de bebé al lado de ellos?

Los dientes permanentes recién brotados tienen pulpas grandes y su esmalte es más translúcido que el esmalte opaco muy blanco de los dientes de leche. Esto hace que parezca que son más amarillos en contraste. A medida que el diente se desarrolla más, el color tenderá a parecer más claro y se mezclará más con los dientes circundantes. A medida que crecen los dientes permanentes uno al lado del otro, su color también se verá más uniforme y más claro. Si desea que los dientes de sus hijos se vean más blancos, que se los cepillen suavemente dos veces al día con pasta de dientes con fluoruro para eliminar los desechos y las manchas que podrían hacer que parezcan aún más amarillos, manteniéndolos sanos. 

¿Qué puedo hacer con mi hijo que se sigue succionando el dedo?

La mayoría de los expertos piensan que a los 6 años de edad, cuando los dientes permanentes comienzan a entrar, es la edad adecuada para tratar el hábito. 
Nos gusta ver el hábito interrumpido porque puede empujar los dientes nuevos en mala alineación. La succión de los dedos alienta a los dientes superiores a sobresalir. También se puede asociar con el habla deficiente, tensiones sociales y otros hábitos. Estos hábitos se tratan con programas basados en la psicología y/o aparatos de la boca. La corrección del hábito muchas veces no es fácil. Su dentista debe ser capaz de evaluar y recomendar qué método es el más adecuado para la situación individual de su hijo. 

¿Por qué mi hijo tiene dos hileras de dientes?

El sitio más común para que esto ocurra es en la región inferior de los dientes delanteros. Sucede en el 30% de los niños. La aparición de dos hileras de dientes se debe a que los permanentes entran detrás de los primarios. Esto suele ser causado por una discrepancia entre el tamaño de los dientes nuevos, y el espacio disponible para que crezcan.
Debe consultar a su dentista. Una radiografía puede ser necesaria para determinar cuánto queda de la raíz del diente primario. A veces, los dientes primarios necesitan ser extraídos pero en muchos casos, si ya están flojos, se caen después de unas semanas.

¿Por qué mi hijo tiene un espacio grande entre los nuevos dientes frontales?

Un espacio grande a veces se nota cuando los dos dientes delanteros superiores entran. Este espacio se llama un diastema. La respuesta fácil es que esta es una parte normal del desarrollo de la mandíbula. A medida que más dientes llegan, el espacio tiende a cerrarse. Cuando los caninos superiores erupcionan cerca de la adolescencia, el espacio suele estar cerrado lo cual les impide bajar correctamente hacia el arco dental. En su mayor parte, la presencia de un diastema antes de los 12 años suele ser una indicación de que los dientes permanentes tendrán suficiente espacio para alinearse. Sin embargo, puede haber otras causas para que haya un espacio entre los dientes delanteros y el área puede necesitar la investigación de la radiografía por su dentista para descartar cualquier problema potencial. 

¿Muchos niños tienen dientes ausentes?

Aproximadamente 1 de cada 20 personas tiene variaciones en el número de dientes. Algunos tienen dientes extra y algunos tienen dientes ausentes. Los dientes faltantes son más comunes en la dentición permanente que en el conjunto primario de dientes. Algunas personas sólo tienen uno o dos dientes faltantes. No hay razón aparente para este hecho o incluso puede ser algo que otros miembros de la familia tengan también. Algunas personas tienen numerosos dientes ausentes. Esto podría estar relacionado con algún tipo de condición sistémica. Su dentista puede ayudar a hacer un plan para manejar el espacio para que sus hijos puedan conservar la función adecuada a pesar de los dientes ausentes; ellos también puede coordinar el tratamiento con el ortodoncista para manejar adecuadamente el espacio y posible reemplazo en el largo plazo.

¿Por qué los niños necesitan selladores?

Cuando los dientes salen por primera vez en la boca aumenta el riesgo de desarrollar caries. Los dientes permanentes que se benefician más de obtener selladores son los molares. Los primeros molares salen a los 6 años de edad y a menudo tienen surcos profundos en las superficies de masticación. El cepillado de dientes muchas veces no es suficiente para limpiarlos correctamente, por lo que con el paso de los años muchos de estos nuevos molares podrían tener caries. El sellador es una protección de revestimiento duro que rellena las ranuras profundas en las superficies de masticación de los dientes posteriores, de modo que los alimentos no se puedan almacenar en ellos. La superficie lisa también hace que el diente sea más fácil de limpiar. ¡Esto impide que se deterioren! Los selladores tienen un largo trazo de seguridad, y son la forma más eficaz de prevenir las caries en las superficies de masticación de los dientes posteriores. Los selladores generalmente se colocan en los dientes permanentes, pero si los niños están en riesgo de desarrollar nuevas caries en las superficies de masticación de los molares primarios, pueden beneficiarse de tener selladores colocados en estos también.

¿Necesita mi hijo un protector bucal para hacer deporte?

Los protectores bucales ayudan a disminuir las lesiones en la boca y los dientes. Se utilizan en muchos deportes donde existe la posibilidad de lesión.
Los protectores bucales pueden ser hechos con un molde de sus dientes o se pueden comprar prefabricados en alguna tienda. El protector bucal hecho a la medida tiene una comodidad y un ajuste superior lo que hace que sea más fácil para el niño hablar al usar el aparato y ofrece una mejor protección. Sin embargo, para un niño de 6 a 9 años de edad, los dientes se caen constantemente para luego ser reemplazados. Puede ser más práctico para este grupo de edad comprar los protectores bucales en tiendas especializadas. Los protectores más caros se pueden comprar cuando todos los dientes permanentes están en su lugar. Tenga en cuenta que los protectores bucales también se pueden hacer y se recomienda ampliamente para los niños que usan brackets. 

Si un niño tiene malos dientes primarios, ¿tendrá malos dientes permanentes también?

Este no tiene que ser el caso. Para tener caries necesitamos dientes, gérmenes en la boca y alimentos dulces. Si los gérmenes se acumulan en grandes cantidades y se comen alimentos dulces regularmente para que luego se les permita permanecer en la boca sin ser cepillados, tendremos una buena receta para la caries. Lamentablemente, los malos hábitos, como comer alimentos y bebidas dulces con demasiada frecuencia y no cepillarse con pasta de dientes con fluoruro a menudo, pueden persistir durante mucho tiempo y después de causar caries en los dientes de leche, causarían caries en los permanentes cuando brotan en la boca. Los niños que tienen cavidades en sus dientes de leche tienen muchas más posibilidades de tener caries en sus dientes permanentes. Pero un cambio en el estilo de vida con una dieta nutritiva que limita el azúcar, el cepillado adecuado dos veces al día con pasta de dientes con fluoruro y las visitas al dentista de forma regular pueden cambiar el ambiente de la boca por completo, dando a los dientes una oportunidad de crecer sanamente. Por lo tanto, los dientes permanentes malos no tienen porque ser afectados por los dientes primarios malos.

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Crianças de 6 a 10 anos de idade

Quando meu filho começará a ter dentes permanentes?

O nascimento dos dentes permanentes ocorre aos 6 anos +/- 6 meses. Com exceção dos sisos, o último dente permanente a nascer ocorre em torno dos 12 anos de idade.

A erupção dentária é variável. Os dentes nas meninas tendem a nascer mais cedo do que nos meninos. No entanto, não é tanto o momento que é importante, e sim a seqüência da erupção dentária. Quando ocorre atraso pode ser uma indicação de algum problemas local. Uma boa razão para visitar o seu dentista regularmente é ter o desenvolvimento supervisionado.

Meu filho perdeu os dentes decíduos há alguns meses e os novos dentes ainda não cresceram. Devo me preocupar?

Às vezes, quando as crianças perdem um dente decíduo, o dente novo já está nascendo e bem visível. Às vezes, leva-se meses para estes começarem a aparecerem na boca. Isso está relacionado a muitos fatores, como a quantidade de espaço disponível para o crescimento dentário, a posição do dente, e até mesmo dos traços da família. Pergunte esta questão ao seu dentista assim que o seu filho perder o primeiro dente. Seu dentista irá avaliar as radiografias do seu filho para então lhe informar o que esperar, e torná-lo ciente de quaisquer problemas em potenciail.

Como posso previnir cáries no meu filho, a medida que inicia-se o nascimento dos dentes permanentes?

À medida que as crianças começam a irem a escola, elas se tornarem mais independente. Elas tem seus próprios hábitos diários e começam a escolher o que irão comer dentro e fora de casa. Abaixo encontra-se umas dicas para garantir que o seu filho continue a ter dentes e corpo saudáveis.

Quando as crianças começam a passa o fio dental nos seus próprios dentes?

O uso do fio dental é difícil. As crianças adquirem esta habilidade em diferentes proporções. Estudos têm demonstrado que muitas das crianças de 7 a 8 anos de idade não têm a capacidade de passar o fio dental sozinhas. Consequentemente, sugerimos que as crianças de 8 a 10 anos sejam apresentadas ao uso do fio dental. Inicia-se aprendendo a passar fio dental nos dentes anteriores. E, ao desenvolver habilidade e destreza com o fio nestes dentes, inicia o uso do fio nos dentes posteriores da cavidade bucal.
Alternativamente, crianças pequenas podem usar o fio dental como um instrumento de prática sozinhos, permitindo que os pais tenham acesso mais fácil para ajudá-los.
É importante usar o fio dental corretamente. Sua equipe de odontologia pode ajudá-lo a aprender.

Por que os dentes permanentes da frente do meu filho são mais amarelados do que os dentes decíduos ao lado?

Os dentes permanentes têm polpas grandes e o seu esmalte é mais translúcido do que o esmalte dos dentes decíduos, que é branco opaco. Isto faz parecer que os dentes permanentes são mais amarelados. À medida que o dente se desenvolve, a cor tende a parecer mais clara, começando a se misturar com os dentes circundantes. Quanto mais os dentes permanentes se desenvolvem próximos uns aos outros, a sua cor também fica mais uniforme e clara. Se você quiser que o seu filho tenha dentes mais branco, uma escovação suave duas vezes por dia com pasta de dente com flúor irá remover os detritos e mancha, as quais poderiam torná-los mais amarelos, mantendo-os, desta forma saudáveis.

O que pode ser feito para o meu filho que ainda está chupando o dedo?

A maioria dos especialistas acredita que por volta dos 6 anos de idade, quando os dentes permanentes começam a erupcionar, é o momento adequado para tratar o hábito. É importante interromper o hábito porque este pode empurrar os dentes permanentes para um alinhamento incorreto. Sucção dos dedos estimula protrusão dos dentes superiores. Além disso, também pode estar associado com fala inadequada, stress social e outros hábitos. A remoção destes hábitos são tratados com programas psicológicos e/ou aparelhos bucais. A correção do hábito às vezes não é fácil. Seu dentista deve ser capaz de avaliar e recomendar qual é o método mais adequado para a situação individual do seu filho.
 

Por que meu filho tem duas fileiras de dentes?

O local mais comum para isso acontecer é na região inferior dos dentes anteriores. Ocorre em 30% das crianças. O aparecimento de duas fileiras de dentes é devido aos dentes permanentes que erupcionam atrás dos dentes decíduos. Isto, geralmente é causado por uma discrepância entre o tamanho dos dentes permanentes, e o espaço disponível para que cresçam. Seu dentista deve ser consultado. Uma radiografia se faz necessária para determinar quanto de raiz do dente decíduos ainda resta. Às vezes, os dentes decíduos precisam ser removidos, mas caso estes já se encontrem soltos, eles cairão após algumas semanas.

Por que o meu filho tem um espaço largo entre os dentes permanentes anteriores?

Um espaço largo, geralmente é notado quando os dois dentes anteriores superiores erupcionam. Este espaço é chamado de diastema, e é uma parte normal do desenvolvimento da maxila. À medida que os outros dentes erupcionam, este espaço tende a fechar. O espaço normalmente se fecha perto da adolescência. Na maioria das vezes, a presença de um diastema antes dos 12 anos é uma indicação que os dentes permanentes terão bastante espaço para crescer de forma reta. No entanto, pode haver outras causas para a existência deste espaço entre os dentes anteriores, se fazendo necessário uma investigação através de raios-x pelo seu dentista com o objetivo de descartar qualquer outro problema em potencial.

Muitas crianças têm dentes faltando?

Cerca de 1 em 20 pessoas têm variações no número de dentes. Algumas têm dentes extras e outras têm dentes ausentes. Dentes ausentes são mais comuns na dentição permanente do que na dentição decídua. Algumas pessoas têm apenas um ou dois dentes faltando. Pode ser que não haja nenhuma razão aparente para esta ocorrência, ou pode ser algo comum entre os membros da família. Algumas pessoas têm inúmeros dentes faltando. Isto pode estar relacionado a algum tipo de condição sistêmica. Seu dentista pode ajudar a fazer um plano de tratamento para gerenciar o espaço, de forma que as crianças possam se manter em função adequada; pode-se também coordenar o tratamento com um ortodontista para manipular adequadamente o espaço e realizar uma possível substituição a longo prazo.

Why do children need sealants?

Quando os primeiros dentes erupcionam na cavidade bucal, eles estão em maior risco de desenvolver cárie dentária. Os molares permanentes são os dentes que mais se beneficiam na obtenção de selantes. Os primeiros molares nascem por volta dos 6 anos de idade e na maioria das vezes têm sulcos profundos nas superfícies da mastigação. A escovação muitas vezes não é suficiente para limpar esses sulcos corretamente, então ao longo dos anos muitos destes molares poderão desenvolver cárie dentária. O selante é um revestimento protetor que preenche os sulcos profundos nas superfícies da mastigação dos dentes posteriores, evitando desta forma acúmulo de alimento. Uma superfície lisa torna a limpeza dentária mais fácil de limpar, prevenindo a cárie dentária! Selantes são considerados seguro, e eficazes para evitar cáries nas superfícies da mastigação dos dentes posteriores. Selantes são geralmente colocados nos dentes permanentes, mas se as crianças estiver em risco de desenvolver cáries nas superfícies da mastigação dos dentes decíduos, o uso do selante nesta dentição também é considerado eficaz.

Meu filho precisa de um protetor bucal para praticar esportes?

Protetores bucais ajudam a diminuir lesões na boca e dentes. Eles são usados em muitos esportes onde possibilidade de injúria.Protetores bucais podem ser confeccionados através de um molde para ajustar aos dentes do seu filho ou podem ser comprados comercialmente. O protetor bucal personalizado é usado no arco superior, tornando a comunicação da criança mais fácil, além de oferecer melhor proteção. No entanto, é mais prático comprar protetores bucais comerciais para uma criança de 6 a 9 anos, uma vez que nessa faixa etária os dentes estão constantemente caindo e sendo substituído. Os protetores mais caros são os que são utilizados nas crianças que já tem todos os dentes permanentes no lugar. Estes protetores também podem ser feitos e são bastante recomendados para crianças que usam aparelhos.
 

Se uma criança tem dentes decídus ruins, ela também terá dentes permanentes ruins?

Este não precisa de ser o caso. Para se ter cárie dental precisamos de dentes, bactérias na boca e alimentos doces. Grande número de bactérias e ingestão regular de alimentos doces sem imediata escovação é uma perfeita receita para a formação da cárie dental. Infelizmente, hábitos de comer doces e beber líquidos açucarados com freqüência, sem realizar a escovação com pasta dental com flúor pode muitas vezes persistir por um longo período de tempo. Estes hábitos podem acabar  acarretando desenvolvimento da cárie dental nos dentes decíduos, e, posteriormente nos dentes permanents. As crianças que têm cáries em seus dentes decíduos têm mais chances de desenvolver cáries nos seus dentes permanentes. No entanto, mudança no estilo de vida com uma dieta nutritiva que limita o açúcar, uma escovação adequada duas vezes por dia com creme dental com flúor e visitas odontológicas regulares podem alterar completamente o ambiente bucal, dando aos dentes permanentes a oportunidade para crescerem de forma saudável, mesmo quando a dentição decídua apresentava-se desfavorável.

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Two Types of Publications are Available

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRIC DENTISTRY (IJPD)

The official publication of the IAPD and the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry, published bi-monthly. It has a true international scope and aims to promote the highest standard of education, practice and research in paediatric dentistry world-wide.

Become a member of IAPD and enjoy immediate online access to the journal. Join Now.

IAPD NEWSLETTER

The IAPD Newsletter is published yearly to report important issues and events of the Association, activities of National Member Societies, news of upcoming International Meetings associated with Paediatric Dentistry and updates of upcoming IAPD Congress.

The Newsletter is sent electronically to all IAPD members and to the Presidents of the National Societies. 

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https://iapdworld.org/publications/iapd-consensus-recommendations/


The Foundational Articles and Consensus Recommendations

An IAPD mission is to be a global resource for evidence-based dental care for children. These Foundational Articles and Consensus Recommendations developed by the IAPD Science Committee are intended to be an up-to-date resource and guidance for the current understanding of pediatric dental practices. 

These selected articles and recommendations should not be construed as standards of care or scope of practice; rather the information is intended to facilitate excellence of care for children globally. 

 

The Foundational Articles and Consensus Recommendations have been vetted by the IAPD Science Committee and IAPD Board, and on a regular cycle each topic will be reviewed and updated. 

As these resources develop and mature, they should lead to more uniform evidence-based oral health care worldwide by giving students and practitioners access to current science.

Foundational Articles and Consensus Recommendations, 2020

Previous
Next
Caries Risk Assessment and Care PathwaysManagement of Early Childhood Caries
Use of Fluoride for Caries PreventionManagement of Dental Erosion
Management of the Developing DentitionMinimal Invasive Dentistry
Management of Molar Incisor HypomineralizationPaediatric Periodontal Disease

Coming Soon!

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https://iapdworld.org/publications/iapd-newsletter/


IAPD Newsletter

The Newsletter is sent electronically to all IAPD members and to the Presidents of the National Societies. 

The highlights of the issue include:


Click here to view (Note: File is ~26 MB)


Previous issues of IAPD Newsletter

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2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

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https://iapdworld.org/publications/ijpd/


International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry (IJPD)

The International Journal was formed in 1991 by the merger of the Journals of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry and the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry and is published bi-monthly. It has true international scope and aims to promote the highest standard of education, practice and research in paediatric dentistry world-wide.

International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry publishes papers on all aspects of paediatric dentistry including: growth and development, behaviour management, prevention, restorative treatment and issue relating to medically compromised children or those with disabilities. 

This peer-reviewed journal features scientific articles, reviews, case reports, clinical techniques, short communications and abstracts of current paediatric dental research. Analytical studies with a scientific novelty value are preferred to descriptive studies. Case reports illustrating unusual conditions and clinically relevant observations are acceptable but must be of sufficiently high quality to be considered for publication; particularly the illustrative material must be of the highest quality.

Become a member of IAPD and enjoy immediate online access to the journal. Join Now.


Editors of IJPD


Go to the Online Journal through the member area


Go to the Online Journal

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International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry

Reg J. Andlaw United Kingdom 1991-1996
R. Holt United Kingdom 1997-2005
Göran Dahllöf Sweden 2006-2010
Milton Houpt USA  2010-2015
Anne O’Connell Ireland 2015- 2019
James Crall USA 2019 –

IAPD WELCOMES PROF. DONALD CHI AS IJPD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

“I am thrilled for the opportunity to set a new direction for the journal, collaborate with an international community of scientists, and showcase the best scholarship in paediatric dentistry.”

Prof. Donald J. Chi
IJPD Editor

IAPD is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Donald L. Chi as Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry (IJPD). Prof. Chi is a pediatric dentist and holds positions as Professor of Oral Health Sciences, Professor of Health Services, and Lloyd and Kay Chapman Endowed Chair for Oral Health at the University of Washington (UW).

Professor Chi graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in Government and Asian Studies, received a D.D.S. from UW, and obtained a Ph.D. in Health Services Research and certificates in Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Public Health from the University of Iowa. Donald has received numerous professional awards, served on multiple editorial boards, and is an active researcher and Diplomate of both the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Board of Dental Public Health.

Reflecting on his appointment, Professor Chi commented, “I am thrilled for the opportunity to set a new direction for the journal, collaborate with an international community of scientists, and showcase the best scholarship in paediatric dentistry.” 

IAPD also wishes to publicly acknowledge and thank Dr. Daniela P. Raggio for the leadership provided during her tenure as IJPD Editor-in-Chief.

IJPD is produced and distributed through a joint partnership involving IAPD, the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry and Wiley. IAPD members receive IJPD as a member benefit.

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Registration Fees


For online registration click here

Early Bird Registration

Valid until 25 August 2020

IAPD Member

membership will be verified
€ 20

Non IAPD Member

from lower income countries**
€ 24

Non IAPD Member

from high income countries
€ 40

Late Rate Registration

From 26 August 2020 until 11 September

IAPD Member

membership will be verified
€ 25

Non IAPD Member

from lower income countries**
€ 29

Non IAPD Member

from high income countries
€ 45

*IAPD Members will be verified before obtaining the reduced rates

** Lower income countries: according to the world bank country list includes: Low Income/ Lower-Middle Income/ and Upper Middle-income economies

For full list click here

Registration fees include:
Full access to the meeting desktop and meeting App, Online Session and recorded lectures after, networking opportunities, Poster presentations.

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Did you know…

 

The IAPD Constitution is the cornerstone of the association. It clarifies the IAPD’s purpose and delineates the framework fundamental principles that the association is built on. 

The By-Laws set forth in detail the procedures of the IAPD and provide further definition to the articles of the constitution.

The Standing Orders of the IAPD applies to all functions of the Association, including Council, Board of Directors, Committee Meetings and Regional Meetings.

 


IAPD Constitution


IAPD By-Laws


IAPD Standing Orders

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This is an example page. It’s different from a blog post because it will stay in one place and will show up in your site navigation (in most themes). Most people start with an About page that introduces them to potential site visitors. It might say something like this:

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…or something like this:

The XYZ Doohickey Company was founded in 1971, and has been providing quality doohickeys to the public ever since. Located in Gotham City, XYZ employs over 2,000 people and does all kinds of awesome things for the Gotham community.

As a new WordPress user, you should go to your dashboard to delete this page and create new pages for your content. Have fun!

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Sponsors & Exhibitors

Platinum Partner


Sponsors & Exhibitors










Sponsorship Opportunities

Take this unique opportunity to join the IAPD20 Virtual , The first IAPD Virtual Meeting and to effectively reach hundreds of the world’s leading international professionals.
Sponsorship options have been created to allow each company the opportunity to showcase their organization as it best suits their needs and budget and to have a full access to all networking benefits.


Download the Industry Prospectus Now

For More Information Contact:


Reut Portugal

IAPD20 Virtual Project Sponsorship Manager
rportugal@paragong.com


Dafna Rajmilevich

IAPD20 Virtual Project Manager
drajmilevich@paragong.com


Loraine Lugasi

IAPD Secretariat
iapd@iapdworld.org 


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Who is the YIAPD Network?

The Young IAPD is a newly established network of junior paediatric dentists who have been practising for up to 7 years. It is comprised of group leaders and young volunteer ambassadors. 

 

We are here to support the existing goals of the IAPD in their efforts to promote the oral health of children around the globe. In addition our network aims to provide a platform of academic and social support for young paediatric dentists. As IAPD members, this is the perfect way to connect, share experiences and learn from each other.

Mission and Vision

Our Network Leaders

The YIAPD Network Leaders act as the “think tank” of the IAPD and work closely with volunteers to develop new activities and grow our Network

Young J. Kim

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Antonio Pedro da Silva

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Nicholas Gichu

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Our Task Force

We are proud to have an elaborate task force of young volunteers who are acting as the founding members of the YIAPD form all across the globe for a two-year period.

They support the YIAPD in all activities.

 


See our Task Force

YIAPD Network Initiatives

IAPD Members enjoy full access to all YIAPD Network initiatives. Join IAPD now if you are not yet a member!


Join IAPD Now


Request to Join the YIAPD Network Facebook Group

Clinical Case Platform

YIAPD Network Webinars

Training Resources

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https://iapdworld.org/a-message-from-the-iapd-maastricht-congress-secretariat/


Dear Colleagues and Friends,

The world is facing bizarre circumstances nowadays. COVID-19 has taken over global policies; human health is at risk; social distancing and other tight regulations are restraining daily life; economic crises are approaching many communities…
Countries are locking down and the world’s map is coloring yellow, orange and red alternately everyday.

Though basically, we love to color the world up in ORANGE we rather see the globe turning to an overall GREEN color soon…

We were looking very much forward and ready to host you in June 2021 in Maastricht for the 28th IAPD Congress. However, due to the unprecedented situation that everybody around the globe is facing right now, we decided, in consultation with the board of the IAPD that postponing the congress would be the best for everybody. The Local Organizing Committee of the 29th Congress (South Africa) was willing to cooperate and postpone their edition as well.

According to our opinion, we should give EVERYBODY around the Pediatric Dental Globe, the opportunity to experience physically the bi-annual meetings of the IAPD. Therefore it should be necessary that everybody could have a safe travel to ánd a safe stay in our beautiful country. As we all know, at the moment nobody can give such a guarantee for any of our countries/ continents.

We are grateful and delighted that together with us, the board of the IAPD and the Local Organizing Committee of the South African congress, were willing to take responsibility and postpone the congresses.

It is a great pleasure to inform you that the 29th IAPD Congress will now take place in Maastricht, the Netherlands, from June 14-17, 2023.

The theme of this 29th bi-annual IAPD congress will still be “JOINING FORCES IN PAEDIATRIC DENTISTRY”. Well, the IAPD has proven already that this is exactly what she stands for: we joined our forces together to take responsibility for your health and safety.
In 2021 we will meet in a “virtual environment” for the 28th Congress but in June 2023 we will be happy to meet you “real-life” in Maastricht!!!

Stay safe, stay healthy and take care!!

Warmest regards,

Dr. M.C.M. van Gemert-Schriks 

President of the Local Organizing Committee IAPD 2023


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IAPD 2021 CONGRESS | GOING VIRTUAL

The 28th IAPD Biennial Congress in 2021 will take place virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic. After the success of the recent IAPD20 Virtual Congress, we look forward to bringing you an exciting online programme and creative opportunities to network while keeping safe! The main theme of our congress will be “Advancing Together While Staying Apart”.

At this point, we would like you to note down the date and include the 28th Congress of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry: IAPD Virtual 10-13 June 2021 in your diary.

More information will follow soon!

WE ARE MULTILINGUAL!


Join IAPD Today


Consensus Recommendations


IAPD Infographics

We are very excited to announce that the new IAPD website is now multilingual!

The IAPD recognizes and appreciates our global readership and the importance of having access to our website in your mother-tongue. With the help of statistical machine translations, Google Translate enables a wide range of translations on the IAPD’s website. Even though the translation is not official, this feature ensures that nearly every country represented within the association has access to the website in their native language. With over 100 different translation options, we invite you to visit the website and make use of this new feature! Simply click on the language selector at the top right corner.

As mentioned in October, our dedicated committees prepared a series of infographics to support parents during the pandemic, see the translations of our infographics here.

The official translations for the Consensus Recommendations are currently underway, and the newly translated documents will be available to you very soon!

IAPD WELCOMES PROF. DONALD CHI AS IJPD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

“I am thrilled for the opportunity to set a new direction for the journal, collaborate with an international community of scientists, and showcase the best scholarship in paediatric dentistry.”

Prof. Donald J. Chi
IJPD Editor

IAPD is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Donald L. Chi as Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry (IJPD). Prof. Chi is a pediatric dentist and holds positions as Professor of Oral Health Sciences, Professor of Health Services, and Lloyd and Kay Chapman Endowed Chair for Oral Health at the University of Washington (UW).

Professor Chi graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in Government and Asian Studies, received a D.D.S. from UW, and obtained a Ph.D. in Health Services Research and certificates in Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Public Health from the University of Iowa. Donald has received numerous professional awards, served on multiple editorial boards, and is an active researcher and Diplomate of both the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Board of Dental Public Health.

Reflecting on his appointment, Professor Chi commented, “I am thrilled for the opportunity to set a new direction for the journal, collaborate with an international community of scientists, and showcase the best scholarship in paediatric dentistry.”

IAPD also wishes to publicly acknowledge and thank Dr. Daniela P. Raggio for the leadership provided during her tenure as IJPD Editor-in-Chief.

IJPD is produced and distributed through a joint partnership involving IAPD, the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry and Wiley. IAPD members receive IJPD as a member benefit.

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Thank you note
We thank our volunteer translators Drs. Constantina Kritikou, Luca Rodica & Arina Vinereanu,

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https://iapdworld.org/postponement-of-the-iapd-biennial-congress-maastricht-netherlands/


IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT

The Biennial Congress of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry which was set to take place from 9-12 June 2021 in Maastricht, Netherlands has been postponed to 2023 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Consequently, the IAPD congress scheduled to take place in Cape Town, South Africa will be postponed to 2025.

Supporting the paediatric dentistry community in 2021 is still possible and the IAPD stays on top of the latest innovation to network and learn during challenging times: The 28th IAPD Biennial Congress in 2021 will take place virtually. After the success of the recent IAPD20 Virtual Congress, we look forward to bringing you an exciting online programme and creative opportunities to network while keeping safe! Keep an eye on theIAPD website, more information will follow very soon.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the IAPD Secretariat at iapd@iapdworld.org.

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Thank you note
We thank our volunteer translator Dr. Figen Seymen

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